OSHA Safety Manuals | Osha Safety News
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Don’t Fall for Injuries With predictable regularity, falls continue to be a leading cause of accidents and deaths on the job. Falls include those on the same level (floor, ground), as well as from one level to another (stairs, ladders, roof, etcetera). They can be caused by either or both of two reasons - an unsafe action of an individual (hurrying, overreaching, improper use of equipment, etc.) or unsafe condition of the situation (poor housekeeping, unguarded opening, surface condition, etcetera). Good footing is the best way to avoid falls and good housekeeping is the best way to ensure good footing. Trash, wires,...

Welding Safety Welding hazards pose an unusual combination of safety and health risks.  By its nature, welding produces fumes and noise, gives off radiation, involves electricity or gases, and has the potential for burns, shock, fire, and explosions. Some hazards are common to both electric arc and oxygen-fuel gas welding.  If you work with or near a welding operation, the following general precautions should help you to work more safely. Weld only in designated areas. Only operate welding equipment you have been trained to use. Know what the substance is that’s being welded and any coating on it. Wear protective clothing to...

Eye Protection Seeing is Believing In just the blink of an eye, an incident can injure or even blind a worker who is not wearing proper protective eyewear. The type of eye protection-safety glasses, goggles, face shields, or helmets must meet the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). In hazardous workplaces, street wear eyeglasses should only be worn in conjunction with ANSI-approved additional cover protection. Eye safety requirement signs should be posted for anyone entering a work area that requires industrial-quality eye protection. Warning signs should be placed near machines, equipment, or process...

Prevent Injuries from Falling Objects Objects falling from above and striking people below have caused serious industrial injuries and account for a number of fatalities every year.  Although the exact number of “falling object” injuries is difficult to determine, documents produced in several recent court cases suggest that the practice of “high stacking” materials and supplies poses a serious safety threat to those below. Provide Adequate Warning - Workers or customers below depend on those working above for their safety.  If you’re going to be doing work overhead, warn those in the area; either verbally or with signs, ropes or barricades.  For...

Common Sense Safety There are a number of safety problems common to most workplaces and job sites that can be solved with a little common sense.  Planning and thinking ahead can help eliminate most of these hazards.  Take a close look at your workplace with these suggestions in mind. Eliminate junk piles.  Organize a cleanup program to remove trash, broken parts, and scrap from work areas, walkways, storerooms, and neglected corners. Look for materials that have been stacked improperly.  An unstable stack is a real danger to anyone who may be near if the material suddenly falls.  Check such things as wood...

Preventing Heat-Related Illnesses When the body heats up faster than it can cool itself, mild to severe illnesses may develop. It’s important to recognize the symptoms of heat-related illnesses and understand how to prevent, control and respond to their effects. Air temperature, humidity and clothing can increase the risk of developing heat-related illnesses. So can age, sex, weight, physical fitness, nutrition, alcohol or drug use, or pre-existing diseases like diabetes. How can you prevent or control heat-related illnesses? Drink water - Drink small amounts of water frequently, about a cup every 15-20 minutes. (Alcohol increases the loss of body fluids.) Limit exposure time...

Preventing Repetitive Motion Injuries Computers are as common in the workplace as telephones. We use them for everything: creating letters and forms, writing reports, editing, electronic mail and surfing the Net. Computers require our hands and arms to be used more than ever. Repeating the same motion over and over again at high speeds with little rest, and applying force to muscles, joints, or tendons while in an awkward angle may be putting more stress on those body parts than is necessary and can increase the chance of developing repetitive motion injuries (RMIs). An ergonomically designed, adjustable workstation is one of the...

Fire Safety In Case of Fire You are responsible for fire prevention at work for your safety and that of your co-workers. The best way to prevent fire is to be on the lookout for possible fire hazards. Be aware of potential fire hazards in the workplace. Report hazardous situations to the supervisor. Know the location of fire extinguishers and other emergency equipment that is available to you. During an actual emergency, protect yourself. If it is not safe for you to get involved, don't. If you're ever confronted with a fire keep your cool, but think fast and act with caution. When a...

Foot Safety It's a Shoe in for Safety The foot is something that doesn’t get much attention unless there is a problem. Therefore, to avoid possible injury, it’s important to think about safeguarding the foot before undertaking any job. Workers may be exposed to various hazardous conditions on the job, including slippery surfaces, climbing hazards, handling or working around heavy equipment and machinery and working around electricity. These different working conditions may require different safety footwear to protect the foot, and the worker, from injury. When choosing safety footwear, you must select the legally approved shoe or boot required for the job activity, equipment,...

Emergency Wash Stations Many new chemical products are introduced into the workplace each year and even with careful planning and safety measures, harmful chemical-exposure accidents occur.  Because of the potential for exposure, a list of all hazardous substances should be maintained at each worksite.  Safety Data Sheets on these substances should be readily available with substance descriptions including their location, risks, manufacturer’s precautions, and treatment or antidote measures should there be a harmful exposure. Emergency wash fixtures must be provided in the workplace if there is a reasonable risk that workers may be exposed to caustic chemicals or other hazardous substances. All...