Emergency Action Plan Sample Written Program This sample emergency action plan is provided as a guide to help you, the employer, implement OSHA's standard for emergency action plans, 29 CFR 1910.38.. In order to comply with the standard and protect employees in emergencies, you must tailor the plan to your worksite and the work that you do. Be sure to modify the sample to reflect the actual conditions at your worksite. Because OSHA requirements provide minimal protection for employees, you may choose to include additional protection in your plan. An emergency action plan describes the actions employees should take in case of...

Bike Messenger Safety Bike messenger workers provide fast delivery service for documents and packages, usually in big city environments. Cars, trucks, trolleys, trains, buses, and pedestrians are just some of the hazards that face bike messengers. The need for fast, efficient service in dense urban areas requires bike messengers to keep their eyes on safety while they are cycling the streets. ALWAYS wear your bike helmet; it can protect you from head injuries in the case of an accident. The helmet should fit snugly and sit flat on top of your head, not tilted backward. Buckle the chin strap securely and ensure...

CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) CO is a colorless, odorless and toxic gas CO is produced by incomplete burning of fuels in vehicles, generators, furnaces, charcoal grills, heaters, and other construction equipment CO impedes the ability of blood to carry oxygen CO can rapidly accumulate in areas that are well ventilated Use of gasoline powered tools indoors can be fatal The symptoms of CO overexposure are: headache, nausea, weakness, dizziness, visual disturbance, changes in personality and loss of consciousness If symptoms occur, immediately turn off equipment and go outdoors Watch co-workers for the signs of CO poisoning...

Power Tools Safety Power tools get jobs done with efficiency and reduced effort. But with power comes responsibility. Power tools can cause injury and even death if they are not used properly. Appropriate training, safe work practices, and power tool maintenance are key to preventing accidents. Only trained workers should use power tools on the job. Training should include reviewing the instruction manual, how to inspect the tools before each use, and following the manufacturer’s maintenance schedule. When maintaining and inspecting power tools, keep the followings tips in mind: Use properly sized fittings and parts for the power tools. Keep tool cutting edges...

Landscaping Safety Job tasks change seasonally in the landscaping business, but power and hand tools and exposure to bugs and the elements last all year long. Know safe work practices to avoid cuts, punctures and amputations. Protect yourself from critters, sun, heat, and cold that you encounter outdoors. Cuts, punctures, and amputations are common injuries for landscapers. Power equipment like mowers, blowers, trimmers, cutting blades, trenchers, and tillers have rotating and cutting parts that can cause these severe injuries. Read instructions and get training on each specific model of equipment you use. Keep your hands, feet, hair, jewelry, and clothing away from moving...

Electrical Hazards Electrical hazards are doubly hazardous in that there is not only the chance of electrocution, but there is also the probability that any electric shock will cause a loss of consciousness that may well result in a fall of some sort. Today we will discuss methods of receiving an electric shock and ways to avoid electrical hazards. Guide for Discussion Methods of Receiving an Electric Shock From a defective power tool. From defective extension cords. From overloading a switch or over-riding a by-pass. By not grounding electrical equipment or using Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters. By coming in close contact with live...

Scaffolding Safety Scaffolding - such as suspended systems from buildings, supported systems from the ground, and aerial systems on mobile equipment - are common to many construction projects and allow workers to do their jobs at elevated heights. But, those who work on scaffolding systems are at risk for falls or falling objects that could cause serious or even fatal injuries and employers can be cited and fined.  However, when workers have received proper training and education in scaffold systems, fall protection equipment, and proper scaffold work practices, they can work safely and feel safe at elevated heights. A Cal/OSHA defined “competent...

Fire Protection and Control Most fires are a result of inattention to the job site operations and surrounding conditions. This lack of attention or protection can result in the loss of life and property. All fires can be easily extinguished if caught soon enough and the proper extinguishing tools are handy. Guide for Discussion Steps to Remember When a Fire Starts: Sound an alarm—yell if necessary. Warn those near the fire. If possible and the fire is small, try to extinguish it. Call the Fire Department if the fire can’t be easily and quickly extinguished. Evacuate the area if the fire can’t be...

Working Safely Around Forklifts Forklifts are not like automobiles; they’re about twice as heavy, due to the counterbalance weight needed to carry large loads. Because forklifts are so heavy, when a pedestrian worker gets injured by a forklift vehicle, the injury is often very serious and sometimes fatal. To avoid becoming a victim of a forklift accident, be constantly aware of the forklift activities around you both in your immediate work area and in other areas of the workplace you may need to go. Forklifts don’t maneuver like automobiles. Forklifts can turn in a very small radius. They’re rear-wheel driven, so their...

Hazardous Material Disposal Many businesses generate hazardous material that are harmful to human health or the environment because they are flammable, corrosive, reactive, or toxic. Due to the harmful potential of hazardous materials, workers must remain aware of the safety hazards and proper handling and disposal procedures in order to protect the environment, themselves, and comply with state and federal regulations. Workers that generate or handle hazardous waste require training on the hazards and safe, proper handling of these materials. Training should cover the procedures for collection, labeling, and storage of the hazardous waste before it is transported for final disposal or...