OSHA Safety Manuals | Osha Safety News
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Baling and Compacting Work Compactors and balers are used in industries such as wholesalers, retailers, manufacturing, garbage and recycling facilities, and other public entities to compress waste materials into smaller, more manageable loads. Using powered rams, waste materials such as garbage, paper, cardboard, cotton, metals, and plastic can be compressed and packed into containers or baled for transport. Workers can get seriously injured or killed if they reach inside or fall into a compactor or baler. Get training on the use of the compactor or baler in your work area. Follow manufacturer’s recommendations on the maintenance, inspection, and use of the machine....

Hand Protection, Handle with Care Next to our eyes, our hands are probably the most important part of our body when it comes to doing our work. They’re involved in almost everything we do. Yet many of the things we do with our hands are done without any deliberate thought. Your hands have no fear. They’ll go anyplace they’re sent and they only act as wisely as the person they belong to; so before you use your hands think of their safekeeping. Here are the most common types of hand injuries and what you can do to prevent them: Traumatic injuries often occur...

Wastewater Treatment Workers Wastewater treatment workers treat sewer and storm water to remove impurities and then release the water to rivers, oceans, or recycled irrigation and landscaping networks. Operators in wastewater plants use mechanical equipment, treatment tanks, and chemicals to clean the water. This variety of processes can pose a mixture of hazards to workers. Because there is so much water involved in the treatment process, slips, trips, and falls are the main hazard for wastewater treatment workers. Practice good housekeeping by sweeping up or squeegeeing water puddles. Mark areas that are prone to puddling. Fix leaks promptly. Use flooring surfaces that...

Restaurant Safety Americans love to dine out and the 8.1 million restaurant workers in the U.S. know it. Restaurant service providers, known as the “front” of the house, may include hosting staff, wait staff, and busboys. These workers may not slice, dice, and flambé on a regular basis, but there are hazards to consider in restaurant dining rooms. Wet floors and fast service can lead to slip, trip, and fall hazards. Mop up spills and clean up spilled ice immediately. Use signs to designate wet floors. Use extra caution when walking near wet floor areas. Consider non-slip matting for areas that are...

Machine Guarding Moving machine parts can cause minor injuries such as cuts and scrapes, major crushing and amputation injuries, and even death. Learn about machine guarding and the safe work practices you need to follow. Get training before you use moving machinery. Understand how the machine works and what the potential hazards are. The main categories of machine hazards include point of operation, ingoing nip points, and rotating parts. Point of operation hazards occur where the machine work is actually done on the material such as cutting, shearing, pressing, punching, or forming. These machines require a guard that prevents the operator’s hands or...

Electric Tools - Grounds for Concern Each year workers suffer shock when handling electrical tools and equipment. To protect workers against the hazards of electricity, teach them the basic facts about the causes of shock and death. One of the big problems in understanding the dangers of electrical shock is the mistaken belief that only high voltages kill. It’s not the voltage that kills, but the amount of current that passes through the body. The condition and placement of the body has a lot to do with the chance of getting a shock. Water and electricity can be a fatal combination. Damp...

Construction Site Hygiene Construction site hygiene encourages good housekeeping, provides workers with clean drinking water, sanitary restrooms, and washing facilities to clean up. These practices encourage good worker hygiene and helps avoid cross contamination to safeguard everyone’s health and safety. Housekeeping Good housekeeping is critical for construction safety. Remember to: Clean the jobsite after major tasks or at least daily; avoid the buildup of hazardous, flammable, or combustible materials. Stack scrap lumber out of the way and remove protruding nails. Keep walkways, stairs, and work areas clear. Ensure that walking surfaces are as level as possible, and that workers have adequate fall protection...

Carpet Layer Safety Carpet layers install a wide range of flooring products in homes and buildings to enhance style and comfort. The hazards involved with this work include the use of sharp and cutting tools and materials, the use of chemical adhesives and treatments, and physically demanding work that can result in ergonomic injuries. If you install carpet for a living, focus on ergonomics. Before installation, you often have to clear out furniture and haul old and new carpeting materials. Use proper lifting techniques to protect your back. Maintain a level of good overall health and fitness. Take frequent mini-breaks to rest,...

Cart Safety Carts come in many sizes and styles and are used by workers in many industries. While carts and the reasons we use them vary, they have some common hazards and safety issues to consider. Hazards associated with carts include using the wrong type for the job or the wrong size of cart for the worker (ergonomics). They can be hazardous when used in congested work areas and in areas of poor housekeeping. They can cause injury to the handler who has had inadequate training and carts can cause the handler injury if the cart has not been properly maintained. All...

Wood Dust – It’s Not Just a Nuisance The wood dust created by cutting, shaping, and sanding wood is certainly a nuisance. However, wood dust can be a serious hazard to both health and safety if not properly controlled. Respiratory effects are the primary health concern. Inhalation of excessive dust can cause nasal irritation and bleeding, inflammation of the sinuses, wheezing, prolonged colds, and decreased lung function. Some species of wood are sensitizers: after repeated exposure, one can become allergic to the dust. This frequently leads to the development of asthma. Western red cedar is a well-known sensitizer and asthmagen. Skin and eye...