OSHA Safety Manuals | Osha Safety News
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Driving Distracted? Driving down the road is no longer a lonely, quiet experience. With cellular phones, two-way radios, and stereos, the interior of your vehicle no longer offers a quiet place to focus on driving. These days with everyone’s life so busy, paying attention while driving can be difficult. Have you ever been driving down the road and suddenly you notice you don’t remember the last three miles you traveled? Although your attention may only be diverted for a split second, the ever-changing variables of the road and other vehicles can make you instantly vulnerable to accidents. The following rules can help you concentrate...

Aircraft Maintenance Safety Aircraft maintenance work includes inspection and repair of aircraft structures, coatings, and systems in hangars and on the air field. Good training and work practices ensure aircraft and worker safety. Tall, heavy aircraft make it hard to see people on the ground when maneuvering in the hangar or maintenance area. Watch and communicate with the aircraft operator to avoid caught/crush accidents (getting run over by a tire or colliding with a wing or tail). Never enter the ramp or flightline without permission from the air field controller. Work at a steady pace. Rushing your work increases aircraft turnaround and accidents....

Bakery Operation Safety The bakery business can be an enjoyable and rewarding profession, but some bakery processes can also be hazardous. Persons who work in bakery operations should be instructed in how to avoid or prevent potential hazards and be properly trained to follow recommended safe work practices. Slips and falls are common bakery accidents due to wet floors, spilled dough, batter, and dry ingredients, as well as uneven or obstructed floor surfaces. Stack materials neatly to keep walkways and production areas clear. Immediately clean up spills and post warning signs when floors are wet or slippery. Use a degreasing solution on...

Asphalt Worker Safety Asphalt is used for paving and surfacing roads, roofing, concrete work, and paints. It is made from petroleum products and is usually heated between 150-200 degrees F. Asphalt is often mixed with solvents (diesel, kerosene, naphtha, toluene, and xylene), binders, hardening and bonding agents (resins), crushed rock, sand, and recycled rubber. Exposure to asphalt fumes can cause serious health effects, so get training, and use safe work practices. When asphalt is heated, the fumes can cause coughing, a scratchy throat, or lung irritation. Long-term exposure can lead to bronchitis or emphysema. Asphalt additives may create vapors that can cause...

Cal/OSHA Recordkeeping and Reporting The California Division of Occupational Health (Cal/OSHA) requires recordkeeping and reporting about safety in the workplace. Required records include the OSHA 300 Log and documents about safety hazard analysis, inspections, and accident investigations. Hazard-specific regulations such as asbestos, diving, mining, etc. also have additional recordkeeping requirements. Keeping track of recordkeeping requirements is a challenge. The OSHA 300 log is probably the most familiar to workers and employers. It records all work-related deaths along with injuries and illnesses that require more than first aid treatment. An annual summary of injuries and illnesses is required to be posted in the...

Winter Driving Winter can mean fog, rain, ice, snow, slippery roads, and poor visibility. It’s a time that can be dangerous for pedestrians, drivers, and other vehicle operators. There are some simple precautions you can take to minimize the risk of accidents and injuries. This winter season, before you get into a vehicle, take a little extra time to make sure everything in and about the vehicle is in good condition and operating correctly. Are the windshield and side windows clear? Do the windshield wipers work? Are the blades in good condition? Can you see in all the mirrors? Are the headlights...

Bomb or Other Threat Response With today’s heightened awareness of foreign or domestic terrorism, a bomb threat can occur at any time, either through the mail or by phone. A threat can also come in the form of an unidentified or suspicious object/package received or left at a worksite or place of business. While many threats are placed as pranks to create mischief or disrupt business, all bomb threats should be treated seriously. Everyone needs to be prepared and respond appropriately if they receive or see a threat. Preparing for a Bomb Threat or Other Acts of Violence Identify key emergency contact names...

Driverless Tractor Safety We all know the most important safety feature on a tractor is YOU, the operator. In fact, drivers are so important for safety, Cal OSHA created a rule requiring an operator at the controls whenever tractors or other mobile farming equipment is moving in the field (Title 8, Section 3441, available online at www.dir.ca.gov/title8/3441.html. This rule is designed to prevent the “driverless tractor,” a situation where the driver hops off a tractor while it is in motion in order to assist field workers. This action leaves the tractor unguided by a human hand or head. Unguided, moving tractors are...

Close Calls - Take a Close Look at Close Calls A “close call” or accident without injury is easy to shrug off and forget. But, there is a danger in brushing off accidents that don’t hurt, harm or damage. When a “close call” happens, it should immediately send up a red warning flag that something was wrong, unplanned, unexpected, and could happen again. The next time it happens, it could result in serious damage, injury or death. For every accident there are usually several contributing factors, most of which can be controlled. The best way to prevent the reoccurrence of an accident...

Drywall Installation Drywall installers are at risk for back injuries, falls and respiratory exposure to dusts, including silica. Drywall sheets range from 50 to 120 pounds each.  Handle these sheets with care during transport and installation to prevent strains and sprains to backs, shoulders, and arms.  First, have the sheets delivered and stacked as close to the installation site as possible.  Next, use forklifts, dollies, and drywall lifts and/or jacks to move and position sheets. Minimize hand carrying and installation.  Pick up one sheet at a time.  Special sheet gripper tools or grip-dot gloves help you hold sheets securely without exerting a lot...