OSHA Safety Manuals | Safety
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Signs General Safety You might see over 100 of them as you ride to work. Signs -- they are everywhere. How many of these do you actually notice? Probably not many. That creates a problem. Not only do signs litter the streets, they may also be all over your work place. Do you see them? Do you notice them? Do they mean something or do they just make the work place look safer to the outsider? Signs are placed to warn and educate. They are not simply decoration. Signs can be permanent or temporary. Signs lose their impact if they address a hazard...

Electrical Hazards - Anatomy Of An Accident A crew of four linemen were installing intermediate poles on an existing single phase 14.4 KV distribution line. Three of the workers were journeymen with 30 or more years of experience. The fourth was an apprentice with almost 3 years experience. The following summary describes a tragic accident: One of the journeymen and the apprentice were belted off below the neutral bracket on a newly installed pole, using hot sticks to tie off the energized conductor. Another journeymen on the ground was using a hold-down to keep the conductor in place while the wrap-lock...

4th of July Fireworks Safety More fires are reported on July 4 than any other day of the year. On a typical Fourth of July, fireworks account for two out of five of all reported fires, according to the National Fire Protection Association. Each year, fireworks cause on average 1,300 structure fires, 300 vehicle fires and nearly 17,000 other fires resulting in thousands of injuries. The National Safety Council advises everyone to stay away from all consumer fireworks and to only enjoy fireworks at a public display conducted by professionals. Follow these safety tips when using fireworks: Never allow young children to play with...

Remember to Lockout &Tagout Anyone who operates, cleans, services, adjusts, and repairs machinery or equipment should be aware of the hazards associated with that machinery.  Any powered machinery or electrical equipment that can move in a way that would put people in danger is a hazard that can be prevented by following locking or tagging procedures.  Failure to lock out or tag power sources on equipment can result in electrocutions, amputations, and other serious-sometimes fatal-accidents. What are the most common causes of these accidents? The machine or piece of equipment was not completely shut off before a maintenance or repair operation. Not...

Fireworks Safety The 4th of July is quickly approaching. OSHA is reminding the pyrotechnics industry to be cautious, focusing on protecting their team from the hazards of creation, storage, shipping and selling fireworks. Here are some tips to keep you and your family safe this holiday weekend; Secure firework facilities Be aware of your surroundings - keep exits accessible and free of debris Know emergency procedures Note the location of fire extinguisher and how to operate Always keep fireworks in view Dispose of fireworks properly Remove loose powder quickly Do not smoke around fireworks (50ft) If you are a company putting on a...

CAL/OSHA Heat Stress Changes Over the objections of employer groups and applause from labor representatives, the Cal/OSH Standards Board approved major revisions to the state's heat illness prevention standard. Executive Officer Marley Hart said the board would request an early effective date for the revisions from the Office of Administrative Law – April 1 instead of July 1. That means that employers must revise their heat illness programs and train employees on an accelerated schedule, with barely five weeks before the changes become enforceable.  Under normal circumstances, the changes would trigger on July 1, as OAL sets effective dates quarterly and April...

Ladder Safety Normally when I come across pictures like this,  assume it's a joke of some sort. Either the setting was staged, or the picture was Photoshopped. This photo - not so much. A very good friend of mine was at work while he was having his house painted. When he came home that evening, imagine his shock when he noticed how the ladder was being supported. The painter's explanation? He simply explained to my friend that he'd been painting for over 20 years. Please, I remind everyone: Ladders must be maintained free of oil, grease, and other slipping hazards. Ladders must...

Arizona House lawmakers hoping to avert a federal takeover of the state's construction safety standards division gave initial approval Thursday to a bill that would revoke, on condition, 2012 legislation that is at the heart of the latest battle between Arizona and the U.S. government. Arizona has its own Occupational Safety and Health Administration that must comply with minimum federal requirements. Until last year, it did. Legislation in 2012 changed Arizona's safety standards so that conventional precautions would have to be taken if someone was working 15 feet above ground or higher. Federal standards say the precautions are required at 6 feet...

OSHA offers guidance for reducing work-related hospital injuries A federal agency launched a new online resource to help hospital leaders protect their employees from getting hurt when lifting patients, handling combative patients, during exposure to chemicals and other common hazards of working in healthcare. Advocacy groups are praising the initiative but argue the risks warrant rules and enforcement in addition to guidelines. “Successful strategies to improve patient safety and worker safety go hand in hand,” said David Michaels, assistant secretary of labor for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, during a news conference announcing the new site, www.osha.gov/dsg/hospitals. The site contains fact books, self...

Please don't let this happen to you. You need proper safety procedures in place to prevent accidents. Two students were badly injured in a chemistry experiment gone wrong. Although the teacher sited will continue to work during this investigation, she was wrong not to instruct her students to wear protective gear. This experiment took a wrong a turn when chemicals exploded, torching two students. Other students did get to the fire extinguisher, but could not get it to work. Students say their teacher is normally a stickler for safety, but in this instance, she did not instruct her class to wear protective...