OSHA Safety Manuals | General Safety
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The Basics of Safety Through Several Years of Investigating Accidents General Safety  Through several years of investigating accidents and research in the field of accident reconstruction, leaders in the field of occupational accident prevention have concluded that there are specific reasons why accidents occur. They found that worker safety is dependent on worker behavior and human factors. They developed ten safety rules and, while some of you may have heard them before, they are worth repeating: STAY ALERT - and stay alive. The more awake a worker is, the less likely he or she is to get hurt. If you are unsure...

Snow Removal General Safety As I opened the front door to go to work, a pile of snow fell back inside and covered my feet. Sound familiar? For many of us who live in a cold climate, snow removal is a reality. How we deal with it may be the difference between a serious injury and an inconvenience. For those who have a snow blower, the job is easier but not without hazard. The first thing to think about is what was left on the driveway before you start the machine. Rocks, toys and other odds and ends are now frozen projectiles capable...

General Safety - "Take Two" Picture this scenario. You are walking through your operation and notice a puddle of oil on the floor. Hopefully, you recognize that this is a safety hazard and proceed to clean up the oil. Feeling that you have done all you can to prevent an accident from occurring, you return to your usual job. But did you really do everything you could have done to prevent an injury? How about if I told you that the next day your co-worker slips and falls on the same puddle of oil and injures his back? You may argue...

Shop Safety Checklist The following are common, important safety guidelines to remember when working in the shop environment: Under no circumstances should unapproved people be allowed to use the shop equipment. Do not allow unauthorized persons to visit or loiter in the shop. Secure the shop when no one is present. It goes without saying that you should never leave a machine in operation while it is unattended. Check emergency equipment such as first aid kits, emergency lighting, fire extinguishers and eye wash stations monthly. Periodically check all hand tools, portable power tools and larger shop equipment. This is usually a...

Employee Responsibility General Safety  An effective Accident Prevention Program should include the defined responsibilities for management, supervisors, and employees. Management, by law, has responsibility for the safety and health of all employees as well as providing a safe workplace. Supervisors have responsibility for providing a safe work place as well as managing the production issues. Now we need to address employee responsibilities and what those entail. Employers and supervisors should expect the employees to be responsible. This starts with getting to work on time, working safely through the day, and addressing concerns to their supervisor. Suggested Areas of Responsibility Employees are responsible to: Listen and...

Signs General Safety You might see over 100 of them as you ride to work. Signs -- they are everywhere. How many of these do you actually notice? Probably not many. That creates a problem. Not only do signs litter the streets, they may also be all over your work place. Do you see them? Do you notice them? Do they mean something or do they just make the work place look safer to the outsider? Signs are placed to warn and educate. They are not simply decoration. Signs can be permanent or temporary. Signs lose their impact if they address a hazard...

Electrical Hazards - Anatomy Of An Accident A crew of four linemen were installing intermediate poles on an existing single phase 14.4 KV distribution line. Three of the workers were journeymen with 30 or more years of experience. The fourth was an apprentice with almost 3 years experience. The following summary describes a tragic accident: One of the journeymen and the apprentice were belted off below the neutral bracket on a newly installed pole, using hot sticks to tie off the energized conductor. Another journeymen on the ground was using a hold-down to keep the conductor in place while the wrap-lock...

Safety And Your Supervisor General Safety  Is job safety important to you? Some people will say yes right away. Others may feel differently, at least when this question is first posed. But survival and avoidance of pain is a basic instinct for all. You may say that safety isn't important to you, but just wait until you get hurt. At that time, I'll bet you will think differently. Safety does not just happen. Remember the old adage, if something can go wrong, it will. We must work to make things happen right; that is, in a safe manner. But one person cannot do...

Office Safety Practices General Safety It is amazing how many people who work in offices take safety for granted. Most people think of a construction site or factory when they think of safety. Well, that's not the way it should be. Granted, construction sites and factories are potentially extremely dangerous; but offices can be too, especially when no one considers safety. Let's review some of the situations that increase exposure to injury and what we can do about them. Avoid walking and reading at the same time. If it is important enough to read, then stop and read it. Never leave file cabinets...

Understanding Electricity And Breaker Panels General Safety The process of forcing electrons to move through a material creates electricity. A standard generator performs this process. The best material for carrying electricity is a "conductor." Most metals are excellent conductors and the most common material used for electrical wiring is copper. In order to provide protection from direct contact with the conductor, an "insulator" is used as a cover around the conductor. Electrons will not move easily through insulators such as most plastics and rubber. Insulators and proper grounding help to prevent electrical shocks. Typically, electricity is provided to your building or facility by...