OSHA Safety Manuals | Osha Safety News
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Yarding Safety (Logging) Yarding is the logging operation that moves felled trees from the slash pile to the landing or storage area prior to transportation. Rigging crews hook cable systems (simple, high-lead, shotgun, skyline, etc.) to the felled trees. Yarding workers manually or mechanically (using skidders and yarders) activate the cable systems to move the logs and slash to the appropriate areas. Moving these heavy materials on often unstable and/or sloping terrain makes yarding a dangerous part of the logging operation. With careful planning at the felling stage, you can improve the safety of the system for everyone working on the yarding....

Cold Storage Safety Cold storage spaces include refrigerator or freezer boxes or rooms in which food and other materials can be stored or processed at controlled, cool temperatures. When you work in and around such spaces, get training and be aware of the hazards that might be involved with cold storage: cold stress, slips and trips, confined space, chemical storage, and ergonomics. Dress in warm, layered clothing for proper insulation to maintain your body temperature to prevent cold stress. Your head loses the most body heat; for extra warmth, wear a warm cap with ear flaps. Fingers, hands, toes, and feet are...

Avoiding Allergic Reactions to Latex Most people who encounter latex products have no health problems, but some workers, continually exposed to latex gloves and other products containing natural rubber latex, develop allergic reactions. Those who work where latex products are manufactured or who have multiple allergic conditions may also be affected. A latex allergy can result in serious health problems. Workers with ongoing exposure to natural rubber latex should follow the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Healths (NIOSH) recommendations which include: reducing exposure, using appropriate work practices, training and education, monitoring symptoms, and when possible, substituting non-latex products. You can take...

Cleanroom Safety Cleanrooms regulate air quality, temperature, and humidity to achieve the ideal manufacturing and experimental environment for high technology applications. Cleanrooms require specific attire, personal protective equipment (PPE), and the use of specialized equipment and chemicals. While modern air handlers manage the particle count, YOU are the best source to control cleanroom safety. You are required to wear protective head, foot, and body coverings in a cleanroom to reduce particulate contamination. In addition, you must wear the required PPE to protect you from the materials and processes that you use. Eye protection such as safety goggles and glasses protect sight in...

Architectural Landscaping Architectural landscaping involves more than just planting and soil; it can include carpentry, stone and concrete work, and the use of landscaping materials such as mulch and rock. Be familiar with the jobsite that you will be working.  A landscaping plan that includes materials and site layout can help you plan the proper order of material delivery and management, along with the necessary tools and equipment.  Call the Underground Service Alert service at 811 to get the location of underground utilities marked to avoid disturbing them.  Mark underground and overhead utilities and power lines on the plan to prevent accidental...

Automobile Repair Services Automobile repair services include inspections, maintenance, and repairs to vehicles. Repairs may require computer analysis, fluid changes, parts changes, or major mechanical work, exposing workers to fire and explosion hazards, chemicals, ergonomic strains, awkward postures, and tool and machinery safety concerns. Get the proper training you need to safely use your equipment and tools. Get training, read, and understand the material safety data sheet on the chemicals you use. Know where emergency exits and equipment are located. Get fire extinguisher training. Emergency eyewash stations and showers should be available, easily accessible, and ready to use if you need them. Wear...

Band Saw Safety Band saws use a powered and rotating continuous metal blade to make even and precise cuts on metal, wood, and other objects. Because the moving blade has cutting teeth, serious injury and even death can occur if you use a band saw incorrectly. Get training on safe band saw use. Read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Always wear safety glasses when you use a band saw. They protect your sight in case pieces of stock fly off or the saw blade breaks and injures your eye. Tie back your hair, remove jewelry, and wear fitted clothing so that you...

Ammonia Safety Ammonia is a commonly used chemical in commercial and household cleaners. In industry, ammonia is used in petroleum refining, to manufacture pharmaceuticals, to disinfect water, and as a refrigerant. In agriculture, ammonia can be used for crop processing, fertilizers, or as an anti-fungal treatment for citrus. Ammonia can also be produced naturally when stored materials such as manure, compost, or other materials break down. Ammonia can be mixed with water and sold as ammonium hydroxide, or used in compressed gas as anhydrous ammonia (meaning without water). Workers in all industries should know that, despite its common usage, ammonia poses health...

Cruise Control Driving Cruise control can be used to automatically control the speed in your vehicle (usually over 25-35 miles per hour) without keeping your foot on the accelerator. It is a great tool to prevent driver fatigue, speeding, and help with fuel economy during long trips on flat, straight roads and highways. Cruise control can cause accidents if you use it improperly or in hazardous road conditions such as city streets, heavy traffic, hills, winding roads, and wet, slippery roads. Controlling the speed of your car with your fingertips on cruise control lets you take your foot off the accelerator and...

Caught or Crushed Injuries Each year, workers suffer approximately 125,000 caught or crushed by injuries that occur when body parts get caught between two objects or entangled with machinery. These hazards are also referred to as “pinch points.” The physical forces applied to a body part caught in a pinch point can vary and cause injuries ranging from bruises, cuts, and scalping to mangled and amputated body parts, and even death. Workers in field, industrial, and office settings are all affected by caught or crush hazards to some degree. Get training and learn about the caught/crush hazards and pinch points specific to...