Loading Dock Safety While a loading dock is an important utility infrastructure commonly found in commercial and industrial buildings, it can be a potentially dangerous place for anyone that works on or around the area. From 2004 to 2014, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) investigated 209 injuries and nearly half were fatalities. Loading Dock Hazards The loading dock area must be inspected regularly to identify potential hazards that may include: Slips, trips and falls caused by floor conditions, poor housekeeping, or dock edge. Forklifts overturning. Pedestrian and powered truck collision. Trailer creep, which can cause a gap between the trailer and...

Sheet Metal Worker Safety Sheet metal workers make, install, and maintain heating, ventilation and air duct systems (HVAC); metal building equipment (roofs, siding, gutters, downspouts, counters, and back splashes); signs, and vehicles. Factory and fabrication shop workers cut raw materials, then form and fasten them into end products for installation at construction sites. Varied sheet metal tools, tasks, and shop, factory, and construction locations require specialized training in hazards, equipment, and safe work practices. Get training on chemical safety, building hazards (asbestos, lead, mold), ergonomics, good housekeeping, vehicle movement, and electrical safety. Provide extra training and good supervision to apprentices new to the job. Sheet...

Dust Explosions Dust Explosions - When combustible or non-combustible materials are broken down into fine dust or powders, they create a fire and explosion hazard affecting many operations and materials: sugar, flour, animal feed, plastics, paper, wood, rubber, furniture, textiles, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, paints and resins, dyes, coal, and metals. To prevent fires from dust explosions, control the “dust explosion pentagon.” This includes the traditional fire triangle: fuel, heat, and oxygen along with a dust cloud and enclosed space. Keep dust levels (fuel) in the workplace to a minimum with dust control and housekeeping. Control flame and ignition sources (heat) such as pilot...

Heavy Equipment Heavy equipment has been designed to handle very large volumes or large loads. As such, heavy equipment is powerful machines and can be dangerous to all around them if not operated correctly. It is important to remember the proper methods used to move them from one site to another, and how to work around them properly. Guide for Discussion General Rules When Heavy Equipment is Nearby Always remain alert to the equipment moving around you. Do not get near moving equipment unless necessary. Never ride on equipment unless it has been designed to carry you. This means it must have a...

Fatigue Can Lead to Accidents Sleep is an important factor in maintaining good health, well-being, memory, and the ability to think clearly. An adequate amount of sleep is defined as 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night. If you don’t get enough sleep due to work shifts, medical conditions, or other life factors, you could build up chronic sleep deprivation and fatigue. Fatigue is a safety concern because it is associated with higher injury and accident rates in the workplace. Fatigue reduces your attention and reaction time, which can cause you to make errors in judgment leading to mistakes at work....

Slips, Trips and Falls Maintain a safe environment with good housekeeping Don’t leave trip hazards in the work area Keep containers on the job for studs and nuts Constantly remove rubbish, scrap, and surplus materials Be on the lookout for foreign substances on the floors Cover or guard floor holes as soon as they are created Floor hole covers should support two times the weight of employees or equipment Survey the site before starting the day and continually audit the work space as work continues An unprotected edge 6 feet or more above a lower level should be protected by...

Arc Welding Safety Arc welders use a powerful electric arc to make and repair plain, coated, or treated metal items. Welders can be stationary, electric powered or portable, diesel/gas powered. Install electric-powered arc welders to code. To provide arc welding safety, ground equipment and place it on an independent circuit with the correct-sized fuse or circuit breaker. Overloading circuits or improper installation can lead to fire, a ground fault, or equipment failure. Mount a safety disconnect switch near the user work area. Operate diesel/gas powered arc welders in well-ventilated areas to control combustion fumes. Do not add fuel to the engine while...

Auto Transmission Repair Work Auto transmission repair can range from simple adjustments to parts replacements and complete overhauls. Work safely during auto transmission repair by wearing your personal protective equipment, understanding the chemicals you work with, and following safe work practices. Wear personal protective equipment during your repair work. Safety glasses prevent flying debris from damaging your eye. Side shields or goggles prevent splashes when you are working with fluids. Wear chemical resistant gloves to protect your hands and skin. Consider mechanics gloves for certain tasks to give you a better grip and prevent cuts and scrapes. Use kneepads to protect your...

Forklift Battery Use and Maintenance Every time you operate a forklift or other powered industrial truck, inspect it to ensure that it is operating properly. Ongoing battery maintenance is critical so that the forklift is always safe and ready to get your work done. First and foremost, the forklift must be checked for enough battery charge to get the job task done. Forklift batteries are generally lead acid or nickel iron. They are charged by plugging the forklift into a fixed station or an “on-board” charger may be brought to the forklift itself. Because the batteries contain corrosive chemicals that can burn...

Eye Protection The protection of your sight requires three extremes: extremely easy, extremely important, and too often, extremely forgotten. Once you have lost an eye or your ability to see, it’s too late. Protecting your eyes is the easiest thing to do, if you care about your eyes. Guide for Discussion Types of Eye Injuries Small flying objects such as dust or other microscopic objects. Particles resulting from chipping, grinding, sawing, brushing, hammering or using power tools (including nail guns). Liquids such as chemicals, tar, asphalt solvents, paints or masonry cleaning solutions. Invisible light rays such as those generated by welding operations or...