Chemical Storage Is A Matter Of Safety And Common Sense There are many work situations where chemicals are routinely relied upon to get the work done. But just as important as the safe handling of these chemicals, is their safe storage. If not stored properly, chemicals can cause a fire, explosion, or personal injury. There are some real and common sense safe storage procedures that should be followed to keep workers and the workplace free of chemical-related accidents. The most important factor in chemical storage safety is keeping chemicals in their original containers. Next, check that each chemical container has a label....

Crane Safety - Safety Precautions for Working Near Overhead Power Lines For the safety of everyone who works with or around cranes, it is important to be aware of the electrocution hazards around overhead power lines. Before beginning work near power lines, power line owners should be notified of the date, time, and type of work involved and their permission should be requested to de-energize and ground power lines or provide insulated barriers. To protect workers against electrocution when operating or working around cranes near overhead power lines the following safe work practices are recommended: Participate in all crane safety programs offered. ...

Employee Safety Responsibilities Employers are responsible for maintaining a safe work place and adopting an Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) to protect workers from job hazards. But employers are not the only ones responsible for safety on the job –  workers have responsibilities for maintaining a safe workplace as well. Do you know your safety responsibilities? Know and follow all of your employer’s health and safety rules such as safe work practices and standard operating procedures. Be familiar with the OSHA safety requirements that regulate your industry. These regulations and guidelines are designed to educate and protect you from hazards and...

Ergonomics Ergonomics literally means “the rules of human strength”. Engineers interested in the design of work environments originated the word in the 1950’s. Today, the purpose of ergonomics in the workplace is to create a better match between the worker, the work they perform, and the equipment they use. A good match increases worker productivity and reduces ergonomic injuries. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 34% of all lost-workday injuries and illnesses are work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). WMSDs are a result of a bad match between the worker, the work they perform and the equipment they use. More common names for...

Cross Contamination Cross contamination occurs when workers spread contaminants around the worksite and into their homes by soiled clothing, shoes, and skin contact. Contaminants can be transferred to the items workers touch, sit on or walk on. Using good personal hygiene at work by hand washing, showering, and changing dirty clothing and shoes can help prevent cross contamination. Workers that handle chemicals and contaminants in the workplace are aware that the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) such as gloves, safety glasses, respirators, coveralls, and boots, can reduce or eliminate their exposures. PPE can act as a barrier against the contaminants and...

Compressed Gas Cylinder (CGC) Safety Compressed or liquefied gas cylinders are often used to store chemicals for industrial purposes. The compression of the chemicals allows for a large quantity of material to be stored in a relatively small space. Because cylinder contents are under high pressure (up to 2,500 pounds per square inch, or psi), there can be physical and chemical hazards involved with the use of compressed gas cylinders. Cylinders range in size from table-top lecture bottles to bottles that are almost 5 feet tall and weigh 155 pounds. When in proper working order, cylinders are fitted with valves and regulators...

Be an Extra-Safe Driver Those who drive for a living would be the first to agree it can be mighty dangerous out there on California’s crowded roads.  Although the common factors of inexperience, recklessness, and aggressive driving contribute to many vehicle accidents, it doesn’t explain why so many professional drivers get into accidents.   A driver may be trained, experienced, and competent behind the wheel, but the very flood of vehicles competing for space on the roads today presents added danger to all drivers.  Even the very best drivers must learn to operate their vehicles with life-saving EXTRAS. Drivers should take extra care...

Don’t Miss the Near-Misses Most safety managers do not usually put much credence to near-miss accidents. Most employees do not even consider reporting them when one happens to them or a coworker, dismissing it as a “no harm done” incident. However, near-miss accidents could be opportunities for corrective actions to prevent serious injuries or even worse, fatalities in the workplace. OSHA and the National Safety Council define near-miss as an unplanned event that did not result in injury, illness, or damage, but had the potential to do so. By the very definition that near-misses do not result in injuries, illnesses, or damages leads...

Asphalt and Pitch Roofing Asphalt and pitch roofing involves the use of hot chemicals that add an additional layer of complexity and hazard to a roofing job. Make sure to get training on general roofing hazards and working at heights. In addition, specialized training in asphalt and tar handling procedures can prevent fires, burns, and potential overexposure to airborne contaminants. Recommendations are outlined below: Before you begin work: Know the properties of the material you use by reading the Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and manufacturer’s directions. Wear the proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Wear sturdy work boots and coveralls along with gloves,...

Emphasis on Confined Space Confined spaces can be deadly.  Overcome by gases, vapors, fumes, engulfed by material, or caught in moving machinery, workers may find they have nowhere to go without proper entry procedures.  Adding to this potential tragedy, most fatalities occur to ill-prepared rescuers. A confined space is large enough for an employee to enter and perform work.  It has limited openings to enter and exit.  It is not designed for continuous occupancy.  A permit-required confined space has these limitations AND added dangers such as hazardous atmospheres, material engulfment, inwardly converging or sloped walls, or other serious safety and health hazards. Confined...