Demolition Safety Planning Planning for a demolition project is just as important as actually doing the work. According to OSHA, a qualified person experienced in all phases of the demolition should conduct the demolition planning. Consider the following when planning any demolition project: The planning methods that will be used to bring the structure down The necessary equipment to do the job Proper permits and public utility notifications Prior to the Start of a Demolition Project The engineer must complete a written survey to determine if there are any hazardous substances in the structure, and asses the condition of the floors, walls, and framing to...

Metal Plating Safety Metal plating puts metals such as tin, zinc, nickel, chrome, silver, gold, etc. onto a surface to change or protect it. The plating method depends on the surface, the metal(s), and the finished product, but there are common hazards that workers need to know. Chemicals are used to prepare, clean, and degrease the surface before plating. They are also used to apply the metal, clean, and polish the product. You MUST get training in chemical safety and proper work procedures. Read the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) to understand the hazards and safe use of the chemicals. Know how to...

Contractor Safety When contractors perform services at employer worksites, a detailed contract and contractor safety program protects the health and safety of both employees and contractors. The employer and the contractor share an obligation to communicate planned work activities, the hazards involved, and the contracted tasks, as well as the training, tools, and equipment that all employees will need. Before agreeing to work with a contractor, review the following data that gives insight to their safety culture and performance: History of safety and environmental regulation violations. Injury and loss history. Total Recordable Incident Rate. Experience modification rate (ex-mod). Job and task hazard...

Safe Handling and Storage of Dry Ice Dry Ice is frozen Carbon Dioxide.  Unlike most solids, it does not melt into a liquid, but instead changes directly into a gas. Handling Instructions: The temperature of Dry Ice is extremely cold at 78˚ C. Do not allow Dry Ice to touch bare skin.  Dry Ice in contact with skin may result in frostbite.  Prolonged exposure will cause severe frostbite. Always wear protective gloves whenever handling Dry Ice. Children must not handle Dry Ice.  Adults only. Storage Instructions: Dry Ice will sublimate into Carbon Dioxide (CO2) gas. Store Dry Ice in an insulated container.  The...

Common Workplace Injuries Injuries in the workplace nationwide number approximately three million every year according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This amounts to roughly 8,000 injuries per day, 350 per hour, or six injuries per minute. Workplace injuries cause pain, wage loss, inconvenience, and time off from work. Employers lose valuable workers, productivity, and an estimated $50 billion dollars as a result. Some of the most frequent injuries are back injuries, falls, and struck by accidents. Back injuries are the most frequent type on the job. Others are hitting or striking objects and machine-related incidents. Learning how these types of injuries occur...

Flat Roofing Safety Single-unit (monolithic) roofing applied to flat roofs may seem “safer” to some roof workers, but the work is still at height and subject to many similar hazards and safety requirements as sloped roof work. Proper fall protection measures, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), and adhering to safe work practices can protect workers from fall hazards. Roof workers installing, maintaining, or repairing flat roofs with a height more than 20 feet or using backward-pulling machinery, such as felt-layers need protection from falls. Fall protection measures can include one or a combination of the following: Personal fall protection Catch platforms Scaffold platforms Standard railings and toeboards Eave barriers Parapets 24...

Establishing A Hazard Communication Program Every day at workplaces, employees work with or are incidentally exposed to hazardous substances that can harm their health or cause other safety hazards. In response to this reality, OSHA enacted the Hazard Communication standard. The standard requires that every workplace, which has or uses hazardous substances, must have a written and effectively implemented Hazard Communication Program that specifically addresses the potential hazards found at that particular site. The program must be accessible to employees (or their representatives) and to OSHA. Whatever the size of the facility or number of hazardous substances, it is essential that both...

Baling and Compacting Work Compactors and balers are used in industries such as wholesalers, retailers, manufacturing, garbage and recycling facilities, and other public entities to compress waste materials into smaller, more manageable loads. Using powered rams, waste materials such as garbage, paper, cardboard, cotton, metals, and plastic can be compressed and packed into containers or baled for transport. Workers can get seriously injured or killed if they reach inside or fall into a compactor or baler. Get training on the use of the compactor or baler in your work area. Follow manufacturer’s recommendations on the maintenance, inspection, and use of the machine....

Hand Protection, Handle with Care Next to our eyes, our hands are probably the most important part of our body when it comes to doing our work. They’re involved in almost everything we do. Yet many of the things we do with our hands are done without any deliberate thought. Your hands have no fear. They’ll go anyplace they’re sent and they only act as wisely as the person they belong to; so before you use your hands think of their safekeeping. Here are the most common types of hand injuries and what you can do to prevent them: Traumatic injuries often occur...

Wastewater Treatment Workers Wastewater treatment workers treat sewer and storm water to remove impurities and then release the water to rivers, oceans, or recycled irrigation and landscaping networks. Operators in wastewater plants use mechanical equipment, treatment tanks, and chemicals to clean the water. This variety of processes can pose a mixture of hazards to workers. Because there is so much water involved in the treatment process, slips, trips, and falls are the main hazard for wastewater treatment workers. Practice good housekeeping by sweeping up or squeegeeing water puddles. Mark areas that are prone to puddling. Fix leaks promptly. Use flooring surfaces that...