Foundry Worker Safety Foundries are a source of many hazards. There is a hot work environment and the potential for burns or fires around furnaces and crucibles.  Molten metals create fumes.  Sand molding materials can create silica dust.  Chipping, sandblasting, and grinding creates dust.  Conveyors, crushers, and stamping machines pose a caught/crush hazard. This combined activity creates a noisy atmosphere.  Workers need proper work techniques, adequate ventilation, and personal protective equipment (PPE) to stay safe. PPE protects you from the foundry environment. Wear leather shoes, gloves, and safety glasses with a side shield.  A hat with a brim protects you from spatters....

Recognizing Unsafe Conditions Recognizing unsafe conditions, or hazards in the workplace is not just a Safety Committee's responsibility. It is everyone’s responsibility from the most junior employee to the company president to identify hazards and make suggestions on how to fix the problem. Guide for Discussion Causes of unsafe conditions or actions: Poor housekeeping. Horseplay. Confused material storage. Careless handling of materials. Improper or defective tools Lack of machine guarding; failure to install warning systems. Lack of or failure to wear proper personal protection equipment. Weather. Worker not dressing for the job to be done. Failure to follow instructions. Steps to take once an...

Lockout/Blockout Lockout-Blockout. If you operate, clean, service, adjust or repair machinery and equipment, be aware of the hazards to which you’re exposing yourself. Any powered equipment that could put you in danger is a hazard that can be prevented when lockout/blockout procedures are followed. Before working on or near energized equipment, visually inspect the work area to identify energy sources. Go through every step of the process to make sure accidental equipment activation won’t take you by surprise. If you identify an energy source, follow appropriate lockout/blockout procedures. Never touch or operate power-activated equipment unless you’ve been trained and are authorized...

Why Accidents Occur Every accident is caused by a breakdown in one of four areas: the worker, the tools used, the materials used, or the methods used. Often there is a breakdown in at least two areas; one being the worker and the other coming from one of the three other areas. The accident’s cause usually results from an unsafe act or an unsafe condition. Today we will review some types of unsafe acts, the results from, and unsafe conditions. Guide for Discussion Types of Unsafe Acts: Operating a tool or some equipment without authority. Working at an unsafe speed. Using unsafe or...

Engulfment In many worksite situations, workers are at risk for engulfment hazards. Engulfment results when a worker is surrounded and overcome by a granular substance such as soil, sand, gravel, sawdust, seed, grain or flour or if submerged in a liquid such as water or a chemical. Engulfment causes physical harm when the material has enough force on the body to cause injury or death by constriction, crushing, or strangulation. Respiratory hazards associated with engulfment includes suffocation from breathing in a fine substance that fills the lungs or from drowning in a liquid. Trenches or excavation pits at construction sites pose an...

Handling Powder Actuated Tools (PATs) Safely Powder actuated tools (PAT) are a tool that gets its power from an explosive charge. The tool uses the expanding gas from the explosion to drive a fastener into materials such as masonry, concrete, steel, and other hard surfaces. Only trained, competent, and authorized persons are permitted to operate a powder-actuated tool (also known as explosive-actuated tools). The training should be in accordance with the specific tool manufacturer’s criteria. A card verifying training should be issued to the authorized person after training is completed. Unauthorized or improper use of a powder-actuated tool could result in...

Animal Processing Safety Animal processing safety facilities combine the hazards of working with live animals along with moving machinery and cutting tools. If you work in an animal processing plant, get training on animal handling and the equipment and processes you will be using. Animals can be unpredictable, so keep your distance during transport and entry to the processing plant. Keep animals calm. Contact with stressed animals can lead to kicks, bites, and scratches. Wear steel-toed shoes with slip-resistant soles to protect your feet. Sturdy work gloves protect your hands. Stunning of animals can be accomplished by an electric stun gun, electric wires,...

Safety Training Steps Preparation Select a topic. Use a priority sequence. Accidents/incidents, demonstrated lack of skills, required or mandatory training (e.g., fall protection, ladders and stairways.) Choose a good location to train (away from noise and other distractions). Research the subject; include company policies and procedures If a new subject, ask what the audience already knows (so you can avoid covering that information in great detail) Always have a good attitude when training! Presentation Describe what is going to be taught Tell why the subject (or training) is important Describe safety procedures, general and specific If necessary, demonstrate safety procedures; one step...

Dry Cleaner Safety Dry Cleaner Safety - Dry cleaners use chemicals, heat, and steam to clean and press clothing and other fabrics. While helping their customers look spotless, dry cleaners need to be aware of their workplace hazards. The use of chemicals is the primary hazard in a dry cleaner. Almost all dry cleaning is done with perchlorethylene (PERC), a solvent. Inhaling PERC can lead to serious health effects such as liver and kidney damage, dizziness, headache, sleepiness, confusion, nausea, difficulty in speaking and walking, unconsciousness, and death. PERC is also a suspected carcinogen. To avoid overexposure, use PERC in closed-loop dry cleaning...

Butcher Safety Butchers prepare a variety of meat products, so butcher safety needs to be the number one ingredient behind the meat counter. When moving boxes of cut meats and carcasses, use proper handling techniques to prevent strains and sprains.  Use carts and other lifting devices for heavy items.  Lift with the legs while keeping your back straight.  Hold the loads close to your body and make more frequent trips with lighter loads. Place meat cuts on a work surface that allows you to work comfortably without overreaching or bending your back.  You may need different surface heights for different tasks.  Cutting, trimming,...