Cross Contamination Cross contamination occurs when workers spread contaminants around the worksite and into their homes by soiled clothing, shoes, and skin contact. Contaminants can be transferred to the items workers touch, sit on or walk on. Using good personal hygiene at work by hand washing, showering, and changing dirty clothing and shoes can help prevent cross contamination. Workers that handle chemicals and contaminants in the workplace are aware that the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) such as gloves, safety glasses, respirators, coveralls, and boots, can reduce or eliminate their exposures. PPE can act as a barrier against the contaminants and...

Asphalt and Pitch Roofing Asphalt and pitch roofing involves the use of hot chemicals that add an additional layer of complexity and hazard to a roofing job. Make sure to get training on general roofing hazards and working at heights. In addition, specialized training in asphalt and tar handling procedures can prevent fires, burns, and potential overexposure to airborne contaminants. Recommendations are outlined below: Before you begin work: Know the properties of the material you use by reading the Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and manufacturer’s directions. Wear the proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Wear sturdy work boots and coveralls along with gloves,...

Getting High On Safety Constructing new buildings, especially high rises, can be hazardous work not only for those who work on the structure but also for anyone on or around the work site. Before construction begins, a competent person should conduct a hazard assessment of the project, noting where injuries or accidents could possibly occur. Then a plan should be developed to eliminate or safeguard against those hazards. All project workers should be informed of the hazards and be trained in safety practices and procedures to follow so that the project can be completed without an injury incident. As falls are the...

Cleaning Products Can Lead to Asthma In 2013, a report published by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) estimated that more than 974,000 adults have asthma caused or aggravated by substances they use or are exposed to at work. This number represents about 40% of all adult asthma sufferers in California. This condition is referred to as “Work Related Asthma” (WRA). WRA can trigger an asthmatic response in workers who already have asthma or even be the cause of new-onset asthma. The asthma is caused or triggered by substances called asthmagens or sensitizers. The more the body is exposed to an...

Cuts, Lacerations, and Punctures Cuts, lacerations, and punctures are common injuries in the meat packing and butchering industry.  Knives, slicers, grinders, and sharp bones are all potential hazards that can be minimized with the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), inspections, and safe work practices. Cuts are usually clean openings in the skin while lacerations have jagged edges.  Punctures create shallow or deep holes in the skin.  Cuts and lacerations often have free flowing blood while puncture wounds often close on their own, reducing bleeding.  For shallow puncture wounds, remove the object if it is small and easy to do so.  If...

Hand Protection, Handle with Care Next to our eyes, our hands are probably the most important part of our body when it comes to doing our work. They’re involved in almost everything we do. Yet many of the things we do with our hands are done without any deliberate thought. Your hands have no fear. They’ll go anyplace they’re sent and they only act as wisely as the person they belong to; so before you use your hands think of their safekeeping. Here are the most common types of hand injuries and what you can do to prevent them: Traumatic injuries often occur...

Handyman Safety A handyman or maintenance man is often called on to perform odd jobs in a variety of the trade fields including plumbing, carpentry, roofing, electrical, painting, and concrete work. You need a broad range of work and safety skills to get the job done. You may do window and roof work, fix roofing leaks, or repair dry rot on roofs and eaves. Choose the correct extension ladder for your work. Inspect the ladder before you use it. Set ladders up on a solid surface and at the correct 4:1 angle ratio. Always face the ladder and hold on with both...

Auto Body Work Repairing auto body damage requires sanding, grinding, and sometimes welding to repair the vehicle before it can be refinished. Get training in collision repair. Know the techniques and tools to complete bodywork. Review the Safety Data Sheets (SDS) for the chemicals you use to identify the personal protective equipment (PPE) to wear and how to mix and use materials properly. Eye injuries are common in auto body shops. Always wear eye protection when you are grinding, sanding, welding, and painting. Safety eyeglasses, goggles, and/or shields can protect your eyes from flying particles, sparks, and splashes. Grinding and sanding the paint off...

Working Safely with Chemicals Chemicals come in various forms and can affect those exposed in different ways. A chemical can take the form of a mist, vapor, liquid, dust, fume or gas. The type of chemical, the way it is used, and the form that it takes determine its effect and what should be done to avoid harmful exposure. Some basic safety precautions should be understood and followed including: Know what to do in an emergency. If there is a leak or spill, keep away from the area, unless you know what the chemical is and how to safely clean it up....

Eye Protection Seeing is Believing In just the blink of an eye, an incident can injure or even blind a worker who is not wearing proper protective eyewear. The type of eye protection-safety glasses, goggles, face shields, or helmets must meet the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). In hazardous workplaces, street wear eyeglasses should only be worn in conjunction with ANSI-approved additional cover protection. Eye safety requirement signs should be posted for anyone entering a work area that requires industrial-quality eye protection. Warning signs should be placed near machines, equipment, or process...