Personal Protection-Picking The Proper Glove Your hands are one of your most valuable assets. Without them, you wouldn't be able to touch, hold, feel write or gesture. In fact, you couldn't do much of anything. Too often, however, we take them for granted. We don't pay attention to how we treat or mistreat them! Just a few examples of when your hands should be protected is whenever you are cutting, painting, welding, or handling sharp metal, chemicals, needles, or blood samples. And it is very important to wear the right glove for each specific task since no one glove protects...

Cemetery Worker Safety Cemetery workers operate year round and in all weather. Tasked with job duties including grounds keeping, excavating, and equipment moving and setup, cemetery workers should use good work practices and get training on job hazards such as field safety, ergonomics, and excavation. Grave digging at a cemetery may be done by hand or with excavating equipment. Before you dig, ensure that there are no underground hazards such as pipes or utilities; don’t assume the area is clear. Get training on the use and maintenance of excavating equipment and inspect it before each use. If you use manual digging tools,...

Cumulative Trauma Disorders How Can You Prevent Them? Cumulative Trauma Disorders (CTD's) are strains that may result from long-term repetitive motion or from continually working in an awkward position. Strains commonly occur in the wrists, arms, shoulders or back, affecting the body's joints and surrounding muscles and tendons. CTD's are said to be today's fastest growing occupational problem, affecting all types of employees, from computer operators to construction workers. Modern equipment, tools and machinery have increased production capabilities in many ways. But in some cases, they have also increased the potential for strain injuries in people. These disorders not only cause great discomfort,...

Warehouse Safety Warehouses range from product distribution centers to popular retailers that sell oversize and bulk products. Whether it is an industrial, commercial or retail facility, warehouse workers should follow safety guidelines for loading docks, conveyor systems, forklifts and pallet jacks, material storage and handling, and good housekeeping. Products enter and exit warehouses through truck and loading dock systems that are usually at a height from the ground. When loading and unloading materials, workers should pay special attention to avoid falls from elevated docks and ramps; yellow striping can draw attention to edges. Trucks delivering goods should be treated cautiously while they...

Tree Trimming Safety Tree trimming operations require climbing, pruning, and felling trees. Hand and portable power tools such as loppers, trimmers, and chainsaws make the necessary cuts. Aerial lifts and chippers bring workers to the right height and clean up the worksite. The two leading causes of tree trimmer deaths are electrocutions and falls, so extra care and training is needed for work at heights and near power lines. Energized overhead or downed power lines can cause electrocutions if you come into direct or indirect contact with them. Don’t use conductive tools, ladders, or pole trimmers where they may contact overhead power...

Foundry Worker Safety Foundries are a source of many hazards. There is a hot work environment and the potential for burns or fires around furnaces and crucibles.  Molten metals create fumes.  Sand molding materials can create silica dust.  Chipping, sandblasting, and grinding create dust.  Conveyors, crushers, and stamping machines pose a caught/crush hazard. This combined activity creates a noisy atmosphere.  Workers need proper work techniques, adequate ventilation, and personal protective equipment (PPE) to stay safe. PPE protects you from the foundry environment. Wear leather shoes, gloves, and safety glasses with a side shield.  A hat with a brim protects you from spatters....

Landscaping Safety Job tasks change seasonally for a landscaper, but power and hand tools and exposure to bugs and the elements last all year long. Know safe work practices to avoid cuts, punctures and amputations. Protect yourself from critters, sun, heat, and cold that you encounter outdoors. Cuts, punctures, and amputations are common injuries for landscapers. Power equipment like mowers, blowers, trimmers, cutting blades, trenchers, and tillers have rotating and cutting parts that can cause these severe injuries. Read instructions and get training on each specific model of equipment you use. Keep your hands, feet, hair, jewelry, and clothing away from moving parts. Before you...

How to Use an Eyewash You’ve probably grown accustomed to the eyewash in your workplace.  But, if you had an eye emergency, would you really know how to use it? Train NOW. Workplaces with chemicals that cause corrosion, severe irritation or permanent tissue damage, or are toxic when absorbed, require an eyewash station. Safe work practices and personal protective equipment (PPE) including gloves, coveralls, safety glasses, goggles, and/or a face shield prevent eye injuries. If you have an eye emergency, notify a coworker right away. Have someone activate 911. Get to an eyewash station immediately.  The station should be within 10 seconds travel...

Auto Body Painting Autobody workers are exposed to potential health risks from volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chromates, and isocyanates during priming and painting. Read the safety data sheet (SDS) for the chemicals you use.  The SDS lists personal protective equipment you need to wear and the safe work procedures for that chemical. Isocyanates are released from some primers and paints.  Exposure to isocyanates is extremely irritating to skin, mucous membranes, the respiratory tract, and the gastrointestinal tract.  Isocyanates can cause rashes, sensitization, asthma, and even death. Hexavalent chromium can be found in the pigments of paints and primers.  It can be inhaled through...

Employee Safety Responsibilities Employers are responsible for maintaining a safe work place and adopting an Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) to protect workers from job hazards. But employers are not the only ones responsible for safety on the job –  workers have responsibilities for maintaining a safe workplace as well. Do you know your safety responsibilities? Know and follow all of your employer’s health and safety rules such as safe work practices and standard operating procedures. Be familiar with the OSHA safety requirements that regulate your industry. These regulations and guidelines are designed to educate and protect you from hazards and...