Butcher Safety Butchers prepare a variety of meat products, so butcher safety needs to be the number one ingredient behind the meat counter. When moving boxes of cut meats and carcasses, use proper handling techniques to prevent strains and sprains.  Use carts and other lifting devices for heavy items.  Lift with the legs while keeping your back straight.  Hold the loads close to your body and make more frequent trips with lighter loads. Place meat cuts on a work surface that allows you to work comfortably without overreaching or bending your back.  You may need different surface heights for different tasks.  Cutting, trimming,...

Scaffold Safety Rules General Before starting work on a scaffold, inspect it for the following: Are guardrails, toeboards, and planking in place and secure? Are locking pins at each joint in place? Are all wheels on moveable scaffolds locked? Do not attempt to gain access to a scaffold by climbing on it (unless it is specifically designed for climbing – always use a ladder. Scaffolds and their components must be capable of supporting four times the maximum intended load. Any scaffold, including accessories such as braces, brackets, trusses, screw legs, ladders, etc., damaged or weakened in any way, must be immediately...

Boiler Safety Workers that use, maintain, and service boilers know that they can be potentially dangerous. Boilers are gas-fired or electric closed vessels that heat water or other liquid to generate steam. The steam is superheated under pressure and used for power, heating or other industrial purposes. Though boilers are usually equipped with a pressure relief valve, if the boiler fails to contain the expansion pressure, the steam energy is released instantly. This combination of exploding metal and superheated steam can be extremely dangerous. Only trained and authorized workers should operate a boiler. Workers should be familiar with the boiler manufacturers operating...

Emergency Action Plan Sample Written Program This sample emergency action plan is provided as a guide to help you, the employer, implement OSHA's standard for emergency action plans, 29 CFR 1910.38.. In order to comply with the standard and protect employees in emergencies, you must tailor the plan to your worksite and the work that you do. Be sure to modify the sample to reflect the actual conditions at your worksite. Because OSHA requirements provide minimal protection for employees, you may choose to include additional protection in your plan. An emergency action plan describes the actions employees should take in case of...

Bike Messenger Safety Bike messenger workers provide fast delivery service for documents and packages, usually in big city environments. Cars, trucks, trolleys, trains, buses, and pedestrians are just some of the hazards that face bike messengers. The need for fast, efficient service in dense urban areas requires bike messengers to keep their eyes on safety while they are cycling the streets. ALWAYS wear your bike helmet; it can protect you from head injuries in the case of an accident. The helmet should fit snugly and sit flat on top of your head, not tilted backward. Buckle the chin strap securely and ensure...

CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) CO is a colorless, odorless and toxic gas CO is produced by incomplete burning of fuels in vehicles, generators, furnaces, charcoal grills, heaters, and other construction equipment CO impedes the ability of blood to carry oxygen CO can rapidly accumulate in areas that are well ventilated Use of gasoline powered tools indoors can be fatal The symptoms of CO overexposure are: headache, nausea, weakness, dizziness, visual disturbance, changes in personality and loss of consciousness If symptoms occur, immediately turn off equipment and go outdoors Watch co-workers for the signs of CO poisoning...

Power Tools Safety Power tools get jobs done with efficiency and reduced effort. But with power comes responsibility. Power tools can cause injury and even death if they are not used properly. Appropriate training, safe work practices, and power tool maintenance are key to preventing accidents. Only trained workers should use power tools on the job. Training should include reviewing the instruction manual, how to inspect the tools before each use, and following the manufacturer’s maintenance schedule. When maintaining and inspecting power tools, keep the followings tips in mind: Use properly sized fittings and parts for the power tools. Keep tool cutting edges...

Landscaping Safety Job tasks change seasonally in the landscaping business, but power and hand tools and exposure to bugs and the elements last all year long. Know safe work practices to avoid cuts, punctures and amputations. Protect yourself from critters, sun, heat, and cold that you encounter outdoors. Cuts, punctures, and amputations are common injuries for landscapers. Power equipment like mowers, blowers, trimmers, cutting blades, trenchers, and tillers have rotating and cutting parts that can cause these severe injuries. Read instructions and get training on each specific model of equipment you use. Keep your hands, feet, hair, jewelry, and clothing away from moving...

Electrical Hazards Electrical hazards are doubly hazardous in that there is not only the chance of electrocution, but there is also the probability that any electric shock will cause a loss of consciousness that may well result in a fall of some sort. Today we will discuss methods of receiving an electric shock and ways to avoid electrical hazards. Guide for Discussion Methods of Receiving an Electric Shock From a defective power tool. From defective extension cords. From overloading a switch or over-riding a by-pass. By not grounding electrical equipment or using Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters. By coming in close contact with live...

Scaffolding Safety Scaffolding - such as suspended systems from buildings, supported systems from the ground, and aerial systems on mobile equipment - are common to many construction projects and allow workers to do their jobs at elevated heights. But, those who work on scaffolding systems are at risk for falls or falling objects that could cause serious or even fatal injuries and employers can be cited and fined.  However, when workers have received proper training and education in scaffold systems, fall protection equipment, and proper scaffold work practices, they can work safely and feel safe at elevated heights. A Cal/OSHA defined “competent...