OSHA Safety Manuals | slips
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Office Safety Practices General Safety It is amazing how many people who work in offices take safety for granted. Most people think of a construction site or factory when they think of safety. Well, that's not the way it should be. Granted, construction sites and factories are potentially extremely dangerous; but offices can be too, especially when no one considers safety. Let's review some of the situations that increase exposure to injury and what we can do about them. Avoid walking and reading at the same time. If it is important enough to read, then stop and read it. Never leave file cabinets...

Floor Buffer Safety Floor machines come in many styles and power levels from the standard electric stick model to battery and propane - powered walk-behinds and ride-ons. They use different pad types and abrasive factors to clean, wax, buff, and strip hard surface floors. Because floor maintenance involves using powered machinery and concentrated chemicals, it is important to keep safety in mind. Get training and read the manufacturer’s instructions for your floor machine. Read the safety data sheets (SDS) for all floor maintenance chemicals and get training on the use and proper mix ratios. Because these chemicals are sold in concentrated forms,...

Watch Your Step!! Don't Slip & Fall Slips and falls are one of the most frequent causes of accidents, both on and off the job. Each year in the United States, more than 300,000 people suffer disabling injuries from falls. Slips and falls can be fatal as well; they rank second only to automobile accidents, causing nearly 12,000 deaths a year. To avoid getting hurt from falls, avoid rushing and remember the following: WATCH WHERE YOU WALK Be aware of where you are walking. Look down continuously for spilled liquids, materials, equipment, changing surface levels, etc. Make sure the area is well-lit or...

Office Safety Many workers think that the office environment is the safest workplace. But, a safe office workplace requires hazard control, good housekeeping, and safe work practices. Arrange your office to allow clear walkways and aisles throughout the rooms and near exits. Attach tall and heavy office furniture to the wall to avoid tipovers in an earthquake. Do not store heavy items or hang pictures over your head in your office or cube. Close file cabinet drawers, file doors, and pull-out work tables when not in use. To avoid jamming your fingers or hands, make sure that cabinet and desk drawers do...

Animal Processing Safety Animal processing facilities combine the hazards of working with live animals along with moving machinery and cutting tools. If you work in an animal processing plant, get training on animal handling and the equipment and processes you will be using. Animals can be unpredictable, so keep your distance during transport and entry to the processing plant. Keep animals calm. Contact with stressed animals can lead to kicks, bites, and scratches. Wear steel-toed shoes with slip-resistant soles to protect your feet. Sturdy work gloves protect your hands. Stunning of animals can be accomplished by an electric stun gun, electric wires, a...

Dry Cleaner Safety Dry cleaners use chemicals, heat, and steam to clean and press clothing and other fabrics. While helping their customers look spotless, dry cleaners need to be aware of their workplace hazards. The use of chemicals is the primary hazard in a dry cleaner. Almost all dry cleaning is done with perchlorethylene (PERC), a solvent. Inhaling PERC can lead to serious health effects such as liver and kidney damage, dizziness, headache, sleepiness, confusion, nausea, difficulty in speaking and walking, unconsciousness, and death. PERC is also a suspected carcinogen. To avoid overexposure, use PERC in closed-loop dry cleaning equipment that controls the...

Loading Dock Safety While a loading dock is an important utility infrastructure commonly found in commercial and industrial buildings, it can be a potentially dangerous place for anyone that works on or around the area. From 2004 to 2014, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) investigated 209 injuries and nearly half were fatalities. Loading Dock Hazards The loading dock area must be inspected regularly to identify potential hazards that may include: Slips, trips and falls caused by floor conditions, poor housekeeping, or dock edge. Forklifts overturning. Pedestrian and powered truck collision. Trailer creep, which can cause a gap between the trailer and...

Restaurant Safety Americans love to dine out and the 8.1 million restaurant workers in the U.S. know it. Restaurant service providers, known as the “front” of the house, may include hosting staff, wait staff, and busboys. These workers may not slice, dice, and flambé on a regular basis, but there are hazards to consider in restaurant dining rooms. Wet floors and fast service can lead to slip, trip, and fall hazards. Mop up spills and clean up spilled ice immediately. Use signs to designate wet floors. Use extra caution when walking near wet floor areas. Consider non-slip matting for areas that are...