Barricades & Warning Devices Two types of construction work, which usually require a great deal of public protection, are new residential developments and highway work. Both should require modifying the existing traffic patterns and more importantly the existing driving habits of the public. Today we will discuss the use of barricades and signs. Guide for Discussion Types of Accidents Collision with construction equipment such as forklifts or trucks. Collision with other vehicles. Pedestrians (both construction workers and visitors) falling into excavations. Driving into excavations. Driving into work areas. Loss of control of vehicle due to changes in road conditions. Types of Warning Devices Signs Cones...

Hammers/Chisels One of the most common causes of hand injuries is from the improper use of hammers and chisels. Both are responsible for a high number of eye injuries as a result of flying nails, metal or concrete chips. Guide for Discussion Chisel Use Never use a chisel with a mushroomed head. Always wear eye protection. Hold the chisel between the thumb and forefingers – don’t make a fist around the chisel. Do not grip a chisel if your hands are numb. If another worker is nearby, place yourself between the other worker and the chipping area. Always use sharp chisels. Hammer Use Use...

Foot Protection Foot protection is probably about the least talked about type of personal protection. Nevertheless, it is still an important safety topic. One nail puncture could cause weeks of lost time off the job. Guide for Discussion Characteristics of a Suitable Boot Puncture resistant soles. Steel toes. Boot extends above the ankle. Sole provides good traction. Type of Injuries Commonly Resulting from Poor Footwear Punctures from nails and tie wire. Bruises of the foot. Unsure footing. Blisters. Body fatigue. Mashing of foot resulting from dropped objects. Other Acceptable Footwear Buckle Overshoes – for work in mud, water and concrete. (*) Knee and...

Gasoline Gasoline when harnessed properly serves as a vital source of energy. Treated carelessly, it can become an explosive monster. Many people are killed or seriously injured each year because they did not treat gasoline as a potential killer.  Today we will discuss how you protect yourself from being injured or causing a fire or explosion. Guide for Discussion Gasoline Facts Gasoline doesn’t It’s the gas vapors that burn. Gas vapors are heavier than As a result, they collect in low areas. Any type of spark can ignite gas Gasoline should never be allowed to come into contact with your skin. Immediately clean...

Dangers Overhead More and more contractors are using mechanical means to lift loads to the working area; it saves time and avoids injuries. But there is still a hazard. If it takes a piece of equipment to lift materials, then you can bet that if the load falls, it can seriously injure or kill you. Always be aware of overhead operations and remember basic safety rules. Guide for Discussion Always be sure loads are carried close to the Use tag lines on loads whenever Use only one signal Be sure the signal person can clearly observe the load and operator at all ...

Falls Wily Coyote always seems to fall into a deep canyon and not be injured at all. People can’t. Then why do we seem to have trouble getting workers to pay attention to the fall hazards around them? Guide for Discussion The following items represent the bulk of the exposure to falls on a construction site. Ladders: Always use the right ladder. Set them on level ground and tie them off at the top (for security). Do not over reach. Do not over extend yourself on the ladder. Always face the ladder and try to use both hands when climbing. Floor Openings: Floor openings should...

Fire Extinguishers One of the quickest ways to lose a job is allow a fire to start. Sometimes fires do start and it then becomes a matter of putting the fire out as soon as possible. The best way is to use a fire extinguisher. Guide for Discussion Care and Use Be sure the fire extinguishers are charged, strategically located and ready for use. Everyone has a responsibility to check to see that fire extinguishers and fire hoses (as well as other dispensing components) are not blocked. Common Types of Extinguishers Class A Fires: Rubbish, paper, scrap, scrap lumber. Use soda acid and pressurized extinguishers or...

Chain Saws Except for log home builders and site clearer’s, it is rare that a chain saw is used on construction jobs. These are a specialty tool that have their own special hazards. Before you use, review. Guide for Discussion Before Operations Always review operator instructions before you use a chain saw. Wear snug fitting clothing; don’t wear any jewelry. Be sure to wear earplugs especially if you plan to cut for a long period of time. Always check for defects in the saw. Replace all defective parts before operating the tool. Don’t use a saw with a dull blade. Check the item...

Safety Away From Work Safety at work is hopefully a matter of routine. Just as important as safety on the job, is safety at home. According to one study, you are actually safer at work than at home. For our discussion today, consider driving, home and play. Guide for Discussion Driving Don’t speed. Drinking and driving don’t mix. Maintain your vehicle in good mechanical condition. Watch out for other drivers. Allow for proper stopping distances. Be courteous, especially if you’re in a company vehicle. Home Minimize electrical exposures. Eliminate slipping and tripping hazards. Don’t overextend on ladders. Teach your family to identify hazards. Know...

Refueling Equipment Refueling equipment is a necessary part of each construction project. As such, it is important that this operation be conducted in as safe a manner as possible. Remember that gasoline and fuel oils are manufactured to cause an explosion (hopefully in the engine). Today, we want to talk about simple refueling rules. Guide for Discussion Concentrate on the task to be performed. Never smoke during refueling operations. Don’t refuel near an open flame or near a sparking situation. Keep a fire extinguisher within 25 feet and closer than 6 feet. If the equipment may accidentally move, chock the wheels. Always...