OSHA Safety Manuals | safety
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Safety & Security After Hours Last one out turn off the lights!" If only it were that simple. In today's work environments, whether it's a fixed facility or a temporary job site, after hours safety and security is an important responsibility that shouldn't be overlooked. This involves more than just turning out the lights. A good approach is to use a checklist, to ensure that everything is checked for safety and security. The list can be customized to suit your own operation, and may include the following: Perimeter Fencing and Gates Vehicles and Machinery Roof Top Access Dumpsters and Recycle Bins Area...

Safety And Your Supervisor General Safety  Is job safety important to you? Some people will say yes right away. Others may feel differently, at least when this question is first posed. But survival and avoidance of pain is a basic instinct for all. You may say that safety isn't important to you, but just wait until you get hurt. At that time, I'll bet you will think differently. Safety does not just happen. Remember the old adage, if something can go wrong, it will. We must work to make things happen right; that is, in a safe manner. But one person cannot do...

Everyone Is Responsible For Safety Safety is everyone's responsibility! As am employee, you should: Learn to work safely and take all rules seriously. Recognize hazards and avoid them. Report all accidents, injuries and illness to your supervisor immediately. Inspect tools before use to avoid injury. Wear all assigned personal protective equipment. On the other hand, it is management's responsibility to: Provide a safe and healthy workplace. Provide personal protective equipment. Train employees in safe procedures and in how to identify hazards. Everyone must be aware of potential hazards on the job: Poor housekeeping results in slips, trips and falls. Electricity can cause...

Accident Prevention Painless & Profitable! Why are you working? The most obvious answer is that you need to earn money. Your employer is in business for the very same reason--to make money. If the people you work for don't operate at a profit, they may not be able to keep you on the job. It may be surprising to hear that most companies do not make money hand over fist. Expenses take a big chunk of the income, and competition limits how much your firm can charge for the goods or services it provides. What's more, competition is no longer just local--it...

Afterthoughts And Regrets…. How often have you said or done something and then later, reflecting on your action, thought to yourself, "How could I have done that?" Here are some afterthoughts which, unfortunately, too many of us have experienced: "That's how we've always done it before." (…before the accident occurred anyway.) "I never thought that a little bolt dropped from that distance would cause so much bleeding." ( I should have worn a hard hat, I guess.) "If I had taken that first-aid/CPR course, I probably could have helped him." (…and chances are, he would still be here.) "I should have taken care of that board...

Dry Cleaner Safety Dry cleaners use chemicals, heat, and steam to clean and press clothing and other fabrics. While helping their customers look spotless, dry cleaners need to be aware of their workplace hazards. The use of chemicals is the primary hazard in a dry cleaner. Almost all dry cleaning is done with perchlorethylene (PERC), a solvent. Inhaling PERC can lead to serious health effects such as liver and kidney damage, dizziness, headache, sleepiness, confusion, nausea, difficulty in speaking and walking, unconsciousness, and death. PERC is also a suspected carcinogen. To avoid overexposure, use PERC in closed-loop dry cleaning equipment that controls the...

Boiler Safety Workers that use, maintain, and service boilers know that they can be potentially dangerous. Boilers are gas-fired or electric closed vessels that heat water or other liquid to generate steam. The steam is superheated under pressure and used for power, heating or other industrial purposes. Though boilers are usually equipped with a pressure relief valve, if the boiler fails to contain the expansion pressure, the steam energy is released instantly. This combination of exploding metal and superheated steam can be extremely dangerous. Only trained and authorized workers should operate a boiler. Workers should be familiar with the boiler manufacturers operating...

Bike Messenger Safety Bike messenger workers provide fast delivery service for documents and packages, usually in big city environments. Cars, trucks, trolleys, trains, buses, and pedestrians are just some of the hazards that face bike messengers. The need for fast, efficient service in dense urban areas requires bike messengers to keep their eyes on safety while they are cycling the streets. ALWAYS wear your bike helmet; it can protect you from head injuries in the case of an accident. The helmet should fit snugly and sit flat on top of your head, not tilted backward. Buckle the chin strap securely and ensure...

Drive Safely Motor vehicle accidents are one of the leading causes of deaths in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control. However, proper driver education, seatbelts, following speed laws, obeying the rules of the road, and paying attention to the road and fellow drivers can help reduce the risk of being injured or killed in a motor vehicle accident. The California Highway Patrol reports the most frequent accident causes on California roads include unsafe speed, unsafe following, improper turns, and inattention to the road. Following posted speed limits on roads and highways and reducing excessive speed improves your ability to...

No Shortcut to Safety Everyone takes a shortcut at one time or another. You cross the street between intersections instead of using the crosswalk or jump a fence instead of using the gate. But in many cases, a shortcut can involve danger. If you have the habit of taking dangerous shortcuts, break it. At work, it can be deadly. An iron worker who tried to cross an opening by swinging on reinforcing rods, slipped and fell 20 feet onto a concrete floor. If he had taken a few moments to walk around the opening, he’d still be tying rods. If you are told...