OSHA Safety Manuals | Machine Guarding
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Shop Safety Checklist The following are common, important safety guidelines to remember when working in the shop environment: Under no circumstances should unapproved people be allowed to use the shop equipment. Do not allow unauthorized persons to visit or loiter in the shop. Secure the shop when no one is present. It goes without saying that you should never leave a machine in operation while it is unattended. Check emergency equipment such as first aid kits, emergency lighting, fire extinguishers and eye wash stations monthly. Periodically check all hand tools, portable power tools and larger shop equipment. This is usually a...

The Mighty Power Press Powerful metalworking machines make punching a hole in sheet steel look as easy a punching holes in a sheet of paper. This equipment's bulk and power is one of the reasons that injuries from power presses are among the most common in metal working industries. Power presses come equipped with numerous safety devices such as guards, barriers, presence sensing devices, or two-hand trips-for very good reason. These machines are unforgiving. The injuries they cause are usually serious. Only ten manufacturing industries out of hundreds primarily use power presses, yet they have nearly 10% of all industrial amputations. There...

Machine Guards If a machine has a part, function or process, which can cause injury, it needs a safeguard. Guards are installed on machinery to protect you and others from injury. This means that when a machine is in operation, its guards must be in place. A guard must never be bypassed or removed during use. If a guard is removed for machine cleaning or repairing, it must be put back into place before reuse or storage. Before beginning any work on a machine, check its moving parts to make sure that all guards are properly functioning and securely in place. Checking...

Die Setting Safety Die setters set up, maintain, and operate presses and cutting machines used to form and cut metal, plastic and other materials into shapes for manufacturing. The die plate sets can be casting shapes, cutting implements, or press plates. Die plates are usually manually inserted into machinery and adjusted so the tooling will function properly and safely. Die setters require proper training and awareness of the hazards involved with this work. Most importantly, die setters must be familiar with the process and safety features of the machinery that they operate. When performing setup and maintenance on this type of machinery, lockout/tagout procedures...

Basic Machine Safety It's tough to imagine modern society without machines hard at work all around us. New and improved machinery leads to increased productivity, higher quality, and more affordable production. But misused machines can be as harmful as they are helpful. Machines that cut metal can cut off fingers. Machines that punch through steel can punch through flesh. Such injuries can cause career-ending disabilities as well as severe pain and suffering. Be alert to these areas when working around or operating machinery: The point of operation: That is where the work of the machine takes place. It's where the pressing, cutting, punching...

Lockout/Blockout If you operate, clean, service, adjust or repair machinery and equipment, be aware of the hazards to which you’re exposing yourself. Any powered equipment that could put you in danger is a hazard that can be prevented when lockout/blockout procedures are followed. Before working on or near energized equipment, visually inspect the work area to identify energy sources. Go through every step of the process to make sure accidental equipment activation won’t take you by surprise. If you identify an energy source, follow appropriate lockout/blockout procedures. Never touch or operate power-activated equipment unless you’ve been trained and are authorized to...

Masonry and Concrete Saws Masonry saws are used to cut tiles, bricks, and blocks of stone, concrete, and other materials. Concrete saws are used to cut channels or openings through concrete blocks, slabs, and walls. Both types of saws can be hand-held, mounted on a stand, or wheeled by hand or motor and may be powered by electricity, compressed air, or fuel. Working with saws can expose workers to hazards such as cutting blades, kick-back, push-back, pull-ins, and dust; training and proper work practices are the key to safety. Workers require training on the safe use of masonry and concrete saws. Cutting...

Band Saw Safety Band saws use a powered and rotating continuous metal blade to make even and precise cuts on metal, wood, and other objects. Because the moving blade has cutting teeth, serious injury and even death can occur if you use a band saw incorrectly. Get training on safe band saw use. Read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Always wear safety glasses when you use a band saw. They protect your sight in case pieces of stock fly off or the saw blade breaks and injures your eye. Tie back your hair, remove jewelry, and wear fitted clothing so that you...

Guard Against Machine Injuries Cleaning a jammed conveyor, reaching for a wrench, or retrieving a dropped glove are common tasks. Yet, each of these acts can lead to a serious injury. Many injuries occur during equipment maintenance. Sometimes workers try to reach past the guards while trying to service equipment or get caught in power transmissions such as belts, pulleys, running rolls, chains or sprockets. Other injuries occur when equipment is unguarded or when machinery starts unexpectedly. If some basic precautions are taken, protecting workers from these injuries can be simple, and inexpensive. Inexpensive physical controls such as machine guards can prevent...

Machine Guarding Moving machine parts can cause minor injuries such as cuts and scrapes, major crushing and amputation injuries, and even death. Learn about machine guarding and the safe work practices you need to follow. Get training before you use moving machinery. Understand how the machine works and what the potential hazards are. The main categories of machine hazards include point of operation, ingoing nip points, and rotating parts. Point of operation hazards occur where the machine work is actually done on the material such as cutting, shearing, pressing, punching, or forming. These machines require a guard that prevents the operator’s hands or...