OSHA Safety Manuals | housekeeping
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Everyone Is Responsible For Safety Safety is everyone's responsibility! As am employee, you should: Learn to work safely and take all rules seriously. Recognize hazards and avoid them. Report all accidents, injuries and illness to your supervisor immediately. Inspect tools before use to avoid injury. Wear all assigned personal protective equipment. On the other hand, it is management's responsibility to: Provide a safe and healthy workplace. Provide personal protective equipment. Train employees in safe procedures and in how to identify hazards. Everyone must be aware of potential hazards on the job: Poor housekeeping results in slips, trips and falls. Electricity can cause...

Watch Your Step!! Don't Slip & Fall Slips and falls are one of the most frequent causes of accidents, both on and off the job. Each year in the United States, more than 300,000 people suffer disabling injuries from falls. Slips and falls can be fatal as well; they rank second only to automobile accidents, causing nearly 12,000 deaths a year. To avoid getting hurt from falls, avoid rushing and remember the following: WATCH WHERE YOU WALK Be aware of where you are walking. Look down continuously for spilled liquids, materials, equipment, changing surface levels, etc. Make sure the area is well-lit or...

Using Portable Fire Extinguishers In the event of a fire, the correct use of a portable fire extinguisher could mean the difference between suffering a minor loss or a major one. Portable fire extinguishers, if used properly, can make that difference. But there are several things to consider in using fire extinguishers. For instance, you must know the class of fire involved and the correct type of fire extinguisher to use. CLASSES OF FIRES AND FIRE EXTINGUISHERS: Class A Involves ordinary combustibles such as paper, wood, cloth, rubber or plastics. The common extinguishing media is water or dry chemical. Class B Flammable liquids, grease...

Seven Common Accident Causes Consider this statistic: 80 out of every 100 accidents are the fault of the person involved in the incident. Unsafe Acts cause four times as many accidents & injuries as unsafe conditions. Accidents occur for many reasons. In most industries people tend to look for "things" to blame when an accident happens, because it's easier than looking for "root causes," such as those listed below. Consider the underlying accident causes described. Have you been guilty of any of these attitudes or behaviors? If so, you may have not been injured-but next time you may not be so lucky. ...

Extension Cord Safety-Take No Chances! We use extension cords almost every day both at work and at home. These are very useful devices, but they can present a fire or shock hazard when either worn out or used improperly. Types of extension cords Extension cords come in either two or three-wire types. Two-wire extension cords should only be used to operate one or two small appliances. Three-wire cords are used for outdoor appliances and electric power tools. The third wire on this cord is a ground and this type of cord should never be plugged into any ungrounded electrical outlet. Only grounded extension...

Power Tool Safety Power tools get jobs done with efficiency and reduced effort. But with power comes responsibility. Power tools can cause injury and even death if they are not used properly. Appropriate training, safe work practices, and power tool maintenance are key to preventing accidents. Only trained workers should use power tools on the job. Training should include reviewing the instruction manual, how to inspect the tools before each use, and following the manufacturer’s maintenance schedule. When maintaining and inspecting power tools, keep the followings tips in mind: Use properly sized fittings and parts for the power tools. Keep tool cutting edges...

Construction Site Hygiene Construction site hygiene encourages good housekeeping, provides workers with clean drinking water, sanitary restrooms, and washing facilities to clean up. These practices encourage good worker hygiene and helps avoid cross contamination to safeguard everyone’s health and safety. Housekeeping Good housekeeping is critical for construction safety. Remember to: Clean the jobsite after major tasks or at least daily; avoid the buildup of hazardous, flammable, or combustible materials. Stack scrap lumber out of the way and remove protruding nails. Keep walkways, stairs, and work areas clear. Ensure that walking surfaces are as level as possible, and that workers have adequate fall protection...

Safe Storage and Disposal of Oil- or Solvent-Soaked Rags Oil and solvent-soaked rags must be stored and disposed of properly to prevent combustion fires. It is important to maintain proper fire extinguishing equipment and smoke detectors in all areas where flammable and combustible materials are being used and stored. Oil-soaked rags are a spontaneous combustion hazard because as the oil oxidizes, heat is released. If the heat is not dissipated, it can build up and ignite the rags. Special oily-waste cans should be used to store oil-soaked rags. These containers allow air to flow around the rags, thus dissipating the heat. The...

Practice Good Housekeeping Good housekeeping is one of the surest ways to identify a safe workplace. You can tell how workers' feel about safety just by looking at their housekeeping practices. Good housekeeping isn't the result of cleaning up once a week or even once a day. It's the result of keeping cleaned-up all the time. It's an essential factor in a good safety program, promoting safety, health, production, and morale. Whose responsibility is housekeeping? It's everyone's. Clean work areas and aisles help eliminate tripping hazards. Respecting "wet floor" signs and immediately cleaning up spills prevents slipping injuries. Keeping storage areas uncluttered...