Electrical Safety – How about your Workplace? The National Institute of Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH), studies electrocutions occurring between 1982 and 1994. The NIOSH researchers analyzed 224 electrocutions that resulted in 244 workplace fatalities. The information they learned provides valuable lessons for everyone that works with or around electricity. Younger males die most often New hires need to take the most care. Construction workers had the highest percentage of electrocutions and other predominate industries included: transportation/communication/public utilities. Utility line workers (linemen) typically receive extensive training in electrical safety, yet they had the highest number of fatal injuries of linemen fatalities...

Electrical Sources in Hazardous Locations Electrical fires can be reduced by using the proper electrical installations and the proper equipment. Hazardous locations require specially designed electrical equipment to protect people and property against increased fire potential. Certain electrical components and instruments are engineered specifically for locations designated as hazardous due to the possible presence of ignitable quantities of flammable liquids, gases, vapors, combustible dust or ignitable fibers. Hazardous locations are classified as Class I, Class II, or Class III. The class is dependent on the physical properties of the combustible materials that may be expected to be present. Class I locations are those...

Don’t Let This Be You – Electrical Safety A crew of four linemen were installing intermediate poles on an existing single phase 14.4 KV distribution line. Three of the workers were journeymen with 30 or more years of experience. The fourth was an apprentice with almost 3 years experience. The following summary describes a tragic accident: One of the journeymen and the apprentice were belted off below the neutral bracket on a newly installed pole, using hot sticks to tie off the energized conductor. Another journeymen on the ground was using a hold-down to keep the conductor in place while the wraplock...

Static Electricity – It can be a shocker! Remember when you dragged your feet across the rug and then touched your brother or sister’s ear! That got their attention! We have also seen the effects of "static cling," when our clothes cling together in the dryer. Static electricity, as a source of ignition for flammable vapors, gases, and dusts, is a hazard common to a wide variety of industries. A static spark can occur when an electrical charge accumulates on the surfaces of two materials that have been brought together and then separated (between two solids, between a solid and a liquid,...

Dangers of Powerline Contact Each year, workers are killed by electrocution from contact with overhead power lines. Over 90 percent of the contacts involved overhead distribution lines. These are the same lines that run in the alleys behind our houses and through our job sites. Since they are so common to us, they seem harmless. This serious mistake is fueled by two common misconceptions: the belief that some overhead lines don't carry enough power to kill, and the belief that power lines are well-insulated. Both are dead wrong. The leading category of contact involves heavy equipment--cranes, drilling rigs, concrete pumps, aerial buckets,...

Electricity and Breaker Panels The process of forcing electrons to move through a material creates electricity. A standard generator performs this process. The best material for carrying electricity is a "conductor." Most metals are excellent conductors and the most common material used for electrical wiring is copper. In order to provide protection from direct contact with the conductor, an "insulator" is used as a cover around the conductor. Electrons will not move easily through insulators such as most plastics and rubber. Insulators and proper grounding help to prevent electrical shocks. Typically, electricity is provided to your building or facility by way of...

Understanding Electricity And Breaker Panels The process of forcing electrons to move through a material creates electricity. A standard generator performs this process. The best material for carrying electricity is a "conductor." Most metals are excellent conductors and the most common material used for electrical wiring is copper. In order to provide protection from direct contact with the conductor, an "insulator" is used as a cover around the conductor. Electrons will not move easily through insulators such as most plastics and rubber. Insulators and proper grounding help to prevent electrical shocks. Typically, electricity is provided to your building or facility by way...

Static Electricity Most of us are familiar with static electricity. We all have walked across the rug and reached for the door knob, only to have a spark jump from our hand to the knob. We have also seen the effects of "static cling," when our clothes cling together in the dryer. Static electricity, as a source of ignition for flammable vapors, gases, and dusts, is a hazard common to a wide variety of industries in Alaska. A static spark can occur when an electrical charge accumulates on the surfaces of two materials that have been brought together and then separated (between...

Electrical Hazards Electrical hazards are doubly hazardous in that there is not only the chance of electrocution, but there is also the probability that any electric shock will cause a loss of consciousness that may well result in a fall of some sort. Today we will discuss methods of receiving an electric shock and ways to avoid electrical hazards. Guide for Discussion Methods of Receiving an Electric Shock From a defective power tool. From defective extension cords. From overloading a switch or over-riding a by-pass. By not grounding electrical equipment or using Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters. By coming in close contact with live...

Electricity “Low voltage” does not imply safety Wet conditions can intensify electric current Make sure work-boots are non-conductive Watch for overhead power lines – handle metal studs in a safe manner If a fluorescent light fixture is falling don’t try to catch it Occasionally check power cords and other electrical equipment for wear Only use equipment approved by Underwriters Laboratory or other accrediting agency Wear protective gear Don’t overload circuits ...