OSHA Safety Manuals | tools
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Hand Tool Safety Hammers, wrenches, chisels, pliers, screwdrivers, and other hand tools are often underrated as sources of potential danger. Hand tools may look harmless, but they are the cause of many injuries. In fact, an estimated 8 percent of all workplace compensable injuries are caused by incidents associated with hand tools. These injuries can be serious, including loss of fingers or eyesight. Hand tools can cause many types of injuries: Cuts, abrasions, amputations, and punctures. If hand tools are designed to cut or move metal and wood, remember what a single slip can do to fragile human flesh. Repetitive motion injuries....

What's This In Our Tool Box?! All right, now that we are gathered around for our weekly Tool Box Safety Meeting, lets actually take a look inside the tool box to see what we might find. Is there a box of horrors waiting for us when we reach in? Field shop boxes, mechanics' chests in shops, the boxes on the backs of our pickup trucks, or the bucket we carry with saddle bags for our personal tools...

Landscaping Safety Job tasks change seasonally for a landscaper, but power and hand tools and exposure to bugs and the elements last all year long. Know safe work practices to avoid cuts, punctures and amputations. Protect yourself from critters, sun, heat, and cold that you encounter outdoors. Cuts, punctures, and amputations are common injuries for landscapers. Power equipment like mowers, blowers, trimmers, cutting blades, trenchers, and tillers have rotating and cutting parts that can cause these severe injuries. Read instructions and get training on each specific model of equipment you use. Keep your hands, feet, hair, jewelry, and clothing away from moving parts. Before you...

Auto Transmission Repair Work Auto transmission repair can range from simple adjustments to parts replacements and complete overhauls. Work safely during auto transmission repair by wearing your personal protective equipment, understanding the chemicals you work with, and following safe work practices. Wear personal protective equipment during your repair work. Safety glasses prevent flying debris from damaging your eye. Side shields or goggles prevent splashes when you are working with fluids. Wear chemical resistant gloves to protect your hands and skin. Consider mechanics gloves for certain tasks to give you a better grip and prevent cuts and scrapes. Use kneepads to protect your...

Handle Tools for Your Safety Each tool is designed to do a specific task. The greatest hazards posed by a hand tool are from their misuse or improper maintenance. It’s up to you to select the right tool for the job and to use and care for it properly. Hand tool safety begins by selecting the right tool for the task and using it the way it was designed. Using the wrong tool for a job is likely to result in an accident. Before you start a job, inspect the tool for defects. Check to be sure that the handle fits tightly...

Contractor Safety When contractors perform services at employer worksites, a detailed contract and contractor safety program protects the health and safety of both employees and contractors. The employer and the contractor share an obligation to communicate planned work activities, the hazards involved, and the contracted tasks, as well as the training, tools, and equipment that all employees will need. Before agreeing to work with a contractor, review the following data that gives insight to their safety culture and performance: History of safety and environmental regulation violations. Injury and loss history. Total Recordable Incident Rate. Experience modification rate (ex-mod). Job and task hazard...