Establishing A Hazard Communication Program Every day at workplaces, employees work with or are incidentally exposed to hazardous substances that can harm their health or cause other safety hazards. In response to this reality, OSHA enacted the Hazard Communication standard. The standard requires that every workplace, which has or uses hazardous substances, must have a written and effectively implemented Hazard Communication Program that specifically addresses the potential hazards found at that particular site. The program must be accessible to employees (or their representatives) and to OSHA. Whatever the size of the facility or number of hazardous substances, it is essential that both...

Working Safely with Chemicals Chemicals come in various forms and can affect those exposed in different ways. A chemical can take the form of a mist, vapor, liquid, dust, fume or gas. The type of chemical, the way it is used, and the form that it takes determine its effect and what should be done to avoid harmful exposure. Some basic safety precautions should be understood and followed including: Know what to do in an emergency. If there is a leak or spill, keep away from the area, unless you know what the chemical is and how to safely clean it up....

If you currently work in a workplace that uses hazardous chemicals governed by a Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) Program, there are changes to the standard you need to be aware of. In March 2012, the Occupational Safety and Hazard Administration updated its HAZCOM standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) to align with the GHS - Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals. The major changes to the standard are: - Hazard classification: Provides specific criteria for classification of health and physical hazards, as well as classification of mixtures. - Labels: Chemical manufacturers and importers will be required to provide a label that includes a...