OSHA Safety Manuals | GHS
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That Container Only Looks Empty! Containers that have held flammable or combustible liquids can remain explosive even after the liquid has been removed. The liquid in the container is replaced by air which mixes with the hazardous vapors. This combination can be explosively ignited by a spark or heat. In fact, these containers are normally more explosive than a full container. How many times have you seen a 5 gallon pail or a 55 gallon drum being used as a welding or grinding stand? This is very dangerous. Any sparks produced could ignite the vapors. Also, the torch flame, heating the container,...

Painter Safety (1) Painters apply coatings to surfaces and products to protect and/or beautify them. They use chemicals such as solvents, fillers, etchers, primers, color, and clear coats. Be familiar with the chemicals you use in the workplace. Read and understand the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) for the proper use of each chemical. Chemical containers require labels with at least the name and the primary hazard of the chemical inside. Choose chemicals that have lower hazard ratings for fire, health, and reactivity. Spray painting and the use of solvents may cause you to inhale dust, vapors, and mists of coating chemicals. Do your...

Emergency Eye Wash & Deluge Showers Let's hope you never need one, but if you do let's hope it's clean and accessible. If you get foreign particles in your eyes or a chemical spill on your body, an emergency eyewash station or deluge shower is the most important initial step in first-aid treatment. Chemical burns to the eye are among the most urgent of emergencies. An eyewash/shower is required if: The Safety Data Sheet indicates a chemical in use is caustic, toxic, or corrosive. The SDS informs that serious eye damage may result. Warnings such as "causes chemical burns" or "causes permanent...

Metal Polishing Metal polishing cleans, brightens, and restores solid or plated items made of gold, silver, stainless steel, brass, copper, aluminum, nickel, chrome, or other metals and alloys. Achieving a smooth and shiny finish requires tools like fixed, tabletop, or hand-held grinders, polishers and buffers. Solvents, acids, and various abrasive materials are used to degrease, clean, buff, and polish metals. Metal polishing can create a variety of hazards including chemical exposure, entrapment/entanglement, noise exposure, and ergonomics. For protection, workers should follow safety precautions and use personal protective equipment (PPE). Gloves, safety goggles, and face shields provide protection for the hands and eyes....

Chemical Hazards - Working Safely With Lead It used to be thought that only children were exposed to lead poisoning hazards which occurred mostly from eating lead based paint chips from doors or windows in the home. This is no longer the case. Studies conducted over the past few years now suggest many adults are exposed to lead in the work place and suffer from varying degrees of lead poisoning. These studies have also shown that eating lead based paint chips is not the only or even the primary way for lead to enter the body. Workers that use lead based paints,...

Hazardous Material Disposal Many businesses generate wastes that are considered hazardous or harmful to human health or the environment because they are flammable, corrosive, reactive, or toxic. Due to the harmful potential of hazardous materials, workers must remain aware of the safety hazards and proper handling and disposal procedures in order to protect the environment, themselves, and comply with state and federal regulations. Workers that generate or handle hazardous waste require training on the hazards and safe, proper handling of these materials. Training should cover the procedures for collection, labeling, and storage of the hazardous waste before it is transported for final...

Ammonia Safety Ammonia is a commonly used chemical in commercial and household cleaners. In industry, ammonia is used in petroleum refining, to manufacture pharmaceuticals, to disinfect water, and as a refrigerant. In agriculture, ammonia can be used for crop processing, fertilizers, or as an anti-fungal treatment for citrus. Ammonia can also be produced naturally when stored materials such as manure, compost, or other materials break down. Ammonia can be mixed with water and sold as ammonium hydroxide, or used in compressed gas as anhydrous ammonia (meaning without water). Workers in all industries should know that, despite its common usage, ammonia poses health...

Metal Plating Safety Metal plating puts metals such as tin, zinc, nickel, chrome, silver, gold, etc. onto a surface to change or protect it. The plating method depends on the surface, the metal(s), and the finished product, but there are common hazards that workers need to know. Chemicals are used to prepare, clean, and degrease the surface before plating. They are also used to apply the metal, clean, and polish the product. You MUST get training in chemical safety and proper work procedures. Read the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) to understand the hazards and safe use of the chemicals. Know how to...

Working Safely with Chemicals Chemicals come in various forms and can affect those exposed in different ways. A chemical can take the form of a mist, vapor, liquid, dust, fume or gas. The type of chemical, the way it is used, and the form that it takes determine its effect and what should be done to avoid harmful exposure. Some basic safety precautions should be understood and followed including: Know what to do in an emergency. If there is a leak or spill, keep away from the area, unless you know what the chemical is and how to safely clean it up....

OSHA Revised Hazard Communication Standard Training Requirement Due Dec. 1 Retailers must train their workers in the new OSHA standards by next month or face a fine. November 4, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. – The deadline for compliance with the training requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) revised hazard communication standard is Dec. 1. OSHA’s revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) contains significant changes in the use of new labeling elements and a standardized format for Safety Data Sheets (SDSs). By the deadline, employers must train their employees in the following areas: click here for more information...