OSHA Safety Manuals | drywalling safety
255
archive,tag,tag-drywalling-safety,tag-255,qode-quick-links-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,hide_top_bar_on_mobile_header,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,columns-4,qode-theme-ver-11.1,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.4.2,vc_responsive
 

Drywall Installation Drywall installers are at risk for back injuries, falls and respiratory exposure to dusts, including silica. Drywall sheets range from 50 to 120 pounds each.  Handle these sheets with care during transport and installation to prevent strains and sprains to backs, shoulders, and arms.  First, have the sheets delivered and stacked as close to the installation site as possible.  Next, use forklifts, dollies, and drywall lifts and/or jacks to move and position sheets. Minimize hand carrying and installation.  Pick up one sheet at a time.  Special sheet gripper tools or grip-dot gloves help you hold sheets securely without exerting a lot...

Drywalling Safety Drywallers put the finishing touches on our home and office interiors by installing and finishing sheetrock walls. Physical stamina is required to lift, cut, and maneuver heavy sheets of drywall and fix them in place. Finishing and sanding seams is also an ergonomic and physical challenge. Consider that this demanding work is often done on a construction site and at heights, and it is clear that drywallers need to think safety on the job. Lifting and maneuvering tools and heavy, awkward sheets of drywall pose an ergonomic risk for drywallers. Maintaining good physical condition and using proper lifting techniques can...