OSHA Safety Manuals | No Skin off your Nose
5492
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-5492,single-format-standard,qode-quick-links-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,hide_top_bar_on_mobile_header,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,columns-4,qode-theme-ver-11.1,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.4.2,vc_responsive
 
sun

No Skin off your Nose

No Skin off your Nose

A suntan may look and feel good, but the sun’s rays can cause serious problems, when exposure is excessive. Radiation from the sunlight damages the skin. Besides sunburn it has been known to cause various types of skin cancer, including deadly melanomas. Having tanned or naturally dark skin does not eliminate the need for protection against the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays. The best precaution is to stay out of the sun as much as possible, but if your job requires you to be outdoors in the sun, wear sunscreen and cover your skin with a long-sleeved shirt, a neckerchief, and hat or visor.

Sunscreens can make your time in the sun safer for a longer period of time against UV rays. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends the use of the strongest sunscreen for your particular skin type. A skin protection factor (SPF) of 15 is a generic rule of thumb, with generally higher numbers for very fair-skinned people. Liberally apply sunscreen every time you’re exposed to the sun, including on cloudy or hazy days. Sunscreen should be reapplied regularly, especially when there is heavy sweating, at least every two hours is the Academy’s recommendation. Keep in mind that certain medications and cosmetics may increase your sensitivity to the sun.

Protect your eyes from the sun’s light as well. Wear sunglasses, visors, caps, or a combination. Not only is it important to protect your eyes from damaging UV rays which can lead to cataracts, but your diminished vision from squinting can present a safety hazard.