OSHA Safety Manuals | trees
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Tree Trimming Safety Tree trimming operations require climbing, pruning, and felling trees. Hand and portable power tools such as loppers, trimmers, and chainsaws make the necessary cuts. Aerial lifts and chippers bring workers to the right height and clean up the worksite. The two leading causes of tree trimmer deaths are electrocutions and falls, so extra care and training is needed for work at heights and near power lines. Energized overhead or downed power lines can cause electrocutions if you come into direct or indirect contact with them. Don’t use conductive tools, ladders, or pole trimmers where they may contact overhead power...

Cutting Down on Chainsaw Injuries Improper chainsaw use can lead to serious injury and even death. Each year, hospital emergency rooms see approximately 30,000 catastrophic injuries from chainsaws. The most frequent chainsaw injuries occur to the left leg and the back of the left hand. These injuries are usually related to kickback and losing control of the saw. Learning about chainsaw accident and injury risk reduction techniques can help you to avoid becoming a statistic. Kickback occurs when the tip of the saw touches an object or when the wood closes and pinches the chain. Tip contact makes the chainsaw immediately reverse...