OSHA Safety Manuals | pesticides
247
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Landscaper Safety Landscapers work outdoors to maintain and beautify the scenery. Their work involves tasks that could prove hazardous: electric and gas power tools, ladders, mowers, noise, sun, and weather exposure. It is prudent for landscapers to cultivate safety while they plant and prune the pansies. Landscapers use powered equipment such as trimmers, mowers, and chain saws to trim and prune grass and plants. Inspect these tools each time you use them to ensure that they are in proper working order. When using flammable fuels, ensure that the storage containers are approved for flammable liquids. Practice safe handling by limiting container sizes...

Landscaping Safety Job tasks change seasonally for a landscaper, but power and hand tools and exposure to bugs and the elements last all year long. Know safe work practices to avoid cuts, punctures and amputations. Protect yourself from critters, sun, heat, and cold that you encounter outdoors. Cuts, punctures, and amputations are common injuries for landscapers. Power equipment like mowers, blowers, trimmers, cutting blades, trenchers, and tillers have rotating and cutting parts that can cause these severe injuries. Read instructions and get training on each specific model of equipment you use. Keep your hands, feet, hair, jewelry, and clothing away from moving parts. Before you...

Agricultural Pesticide Use Regulations Pesticides can be hazardous to workers if they are exposed to them through the skin, eyes, by mouth, or in the air they breathe. Agricultural pesticide handlers should get the proper certificates, permits, and training to use pesticides safely, correctly, and according to the requirements of the law. The California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) governs pesticide use in agricultural operations and classifies pesticides as “general” or “restricted” use. Workers must be certified to buy, use, or supervise the use of restricted pesticides and usually require a permit from the local to do so. Workers must read and follow...

Cleaning Pesticide Soiled Clothing Clothing worn while applying pesticides normally becomes contaminated.  From these clothes, the body can contact and absorb the chemicals.  Protective clothing (long-sleeve shirts, pants, gloves, hat, and boots) can reduce pesticide exposure, but unless they are laundered properly, significant amounts of pesticides can remain on them or be passed onto other clothing.  Keep in mind the following to guard against pesticide exposure from clothing. Launder clothing after each day’s wear. Clothing repeatedly soiled before cleaning can retain pesticides even after it’s later laundered.  Washing less frequently also puts more chemicals into the wash and rinse water. Pre-rinse...