OSHA Safety Manuals | lockout/tagout
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Shop Safety Checklist The following are common, important safety guidelines to remember when working in the shop environment: Under no circumstances should unapproved people be allowed to use the shop equipment. Do not allow unauthorized persons to visit or loiter in the shop. Secure the shop when no one is present. It goes without saying that you should never leave a machine in operation while it is unattended. Check emergency equipment such as first aid kits, emergency lighting, fire extinguishers and eye wash stations monthly. Periodically check all hand tools, portable power tools and larger shop equipment. This is usually a...

Changing Crops During Drought The California agriculture industry grows half of the fruits, vegetables, and nuts consumed in our nation. As drought conditions intensify, many farmers are changing their crops to less water intensive plants, drought resistant crops, or leaving their lands fallow. With this shift, causing needed changes in cultivation and harvesting, require farmers to conduct a hazard analysis to update safety procedures for equipment, tools and chemicals related to new crops and processes. New crops may require changing implements on your farming equipment. Make sure to: Get training on the operation of any new blades, discs, or other implements Use...

Machine Guards If a machine has a part, function or process, which can cause injury, it needs a safeguard. Guards are installed on machinery to protect you and others from injury. This means that when a machine is in operation, its guards must be in place. A guard must never be bypassed or removed during use. If a guard is removed for machine cleaning or repairing, it must be put back into place before reuse or storage. Before beginning any work on a machine, check its moving parts to make sure that all guards are properly functioning and securely in place. Checking...

Basic Machine Safety It's tough to imagine modern society without machines hard at work all around us. New and improved machinery leads to increased productivity, higher quality, and more affordable production. But misused machines can be as harmful as they are helpful. Machines that cut metal can cut off fingers. Machines that punch through steel can punch through flesh. Such injuries can cause career-ending disabilities as well as severe pain and suffering. Be alert to these areas when working around or operating machinery: The point of operation: That is where the work of the machine takes place. It's where the pressing, cutting, punching...

Lockout/Blockout If you operate, clean, service, adjust or repair machinery and equipment, be aware of the hazards to which you’re exposing yourself. Any powered equipment that could put you in danger is a hazard that can be prevented when lockout/blockout procedures are followed. Before working on or near energized equipment, visually inspect the work area to identify energy sources. Go through every step of the process to make sure accidental equipment activation won’t take you by surprise. If you identify an energy source, follow appropriate lockout/blockout procedures. Never touch or operate power-activated equipment unless you’ve been trained and are authorized to...

Don't Get Caught in the Crush Crushing accidents occur when the body or any part of the body is squeezed between two moving objects or caught between one moving and one stationary object. Minor crushing accidents can cost workers in many ways, in pain, disability, and the loss of a job. Major crushing accidents can even cost a life. There are some simple things workers can do to lessen their chance of experiencing crushing injuries. The first, and most important thing, is for workers to know when they are placing themselves or any of their body parts in a situation of possible...

Contractor Safety When contractors perform services at employer worksites, a detailed contract and contractor safety program protects the health and safety of both employees and contractors. The employer and the contractor share an obligation to communicate planned work activities, the hazards involved, and the contracted tasks, as well as the training, tools, and equipment that all employees will need. Before agreeing to work with a contractor, review the following data that gives insight to their safety culture and performance: History of safety and environmental regulation violations. Injury and loss history. Total Recordable Incident Rate. Experience modification rate (ex-mod). Job and task hazard...

Remember to Lockout &Tagout Anyone who operates, cleans, services, adjusts, and repairs machinery or equipment should be aware of the hazards associated with that machinery.  Any powered machinery or electrical equipment that can move in a way that would put people in danger is a hazard that can be prevented by following locking or tagging procedures.  Failure to lock out or tag power sources on equipment can result in electrocutions, amputations, and other serious-sometimes fatal-accidents. What are the most common causes of these accidents? The machine or piece of equipment was not completely shut off before a maintenance or repair operation. Not...