OSHA Safety Manuals | eyewash
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Emergency Eye Wash & Deluge Showers Let's hope you never need one, but if you do let's hope it's clean and accessible. If you get foreign particles in your eyes or a chemical spill on your body, an emergency eyewash station or deluge shower is the most important initial step in first-aid treatment. Chemical burns to the eye are among the most urgent of emergencies. An eyewash/shower is required if: The Safety Data Sheet indicates a chemical in use is caustic, toxic, or corrosive. The SDS informs that serious eye damage may result. Warnings such as "causes chemical burns" or "causes permanent...

How to Use an Eyewash You’ve probably grown accustomed to the eyewash in your workplace.  But, if you had an eye emergency, would you really know how to use it? Train NOW. Workplaces with chemicals that cause corrosion, severe irritation or permanent tissue damage, or are toxic when absorbed, require an eyewash station. Safe work practices and personal protective equipment (PPE) including gloves, coveralls, safety glasses, goggles, and/or a face shield prevent eye injuries. If you have an eye emergency, notify a coworker right away. Have someone activate 911. Get to an eyewash station immediately.  The station should be within 10 seconds travel...