OSHA Safety Manuals | cuts
416
archive,tag,tag-cuts,tag-416,qode-quick-links-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,hide_top_bar_on_mobile_header,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,columns-4,qode-theme-ver-11.1,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.4.2,vc_responsive
 

Hand Tool Safety Hammers, wrenches, chisels, pliers, screwdrivers, and other hand tools are often underrated as sources of potential danger. Hand tools may look harmless, but they are the cause of many injuries. In fact, an estimated 8 percent of all workplace compensable injuries are caused by incidents associated with hand tools. These injuries can be serious, including loss of fingers or eyesight. Hand tools can cause many types of injuries: Cuts, abrasions, amputations, and punctures. If hand tools are designed to cut or move metal and wood, remember what a single slip can do to fragile human flesh. Repetitive motion injuries....

Animal Processing Safety Animal processing facilities combine the hazards of working with live animals along with moving machinery and cutting tools. If you work in an animal processing plant, get training on animal handling and the equipment and processes you will be using. Animals can be unpredictable, so keep your distance during transport and entry to the processing plant. Keep animals calm. Contact with stressed animals can lead to kicks, bites, and scratches. Wear steel-toed shoes with slip-resistant soles to protect your feet. Sturdy work gloves protect your hands. Stunning of animals can be accomplished by an electric stun gun, electric wires, a...

Landscaping Safety Job tasks change seasonally for a landscaper, but power and hand tools and exposure to bugs and the elements last all year long. Know safe work practices to avoid cuts, punctures and amputations. Protect yourself from critters, sun, heat, and cold that you encounter outdoors. Cuts, punctures, and amputations are common injuries for landscapers. Power equipment like mowers, blowers, trimmers, cutting blades, trenchers, and tillers have rotating and cutting parts that can cause these severe injuries. Read instructions and get training on each specific model of equipment you use. Keep your hands, feet, hair, jewelry, and clothing away from moving parts. Before you...

Sheet Metal Worker Safety Sheet metal workers make, install, and maintain heating, ventilation and air duct systems (HVAC); metal building equipment (roofs, siding, gutters, downspouts, counters, and back splashes); signs, and vehicles. Factory and fabrication shop workers cut raw materials, then form and fasten them into end products for installation at construction sites. Varied sheet metal tools, tasks, and shop, factory, and construction locations require specialized training in hazards, equipment, and safe work practices. Get training on chemical safety, building hazards (asbestos, lead, mold), ergonomics, good housekeeping, vehicle movement, and electrical safety. Provide extra training and good supervision to apprentices new to the job. Sheet...

Cuts, Lacerations, and Punctures Cuts, lacerations, and punctures are common injuries in the meat packing and butchering industry.  Knives, slicers, grinders, and sharp bones are all potential hazards that can be minimized with the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), inspections, and safe work practices. Cuts are usually clean openings in the skin while lacerations have jagged edges.  Punctures create shallow or deep holes in the skin.  Cuts and lacerations often have free flowing blood while puncture wounds often close on their own, reducing bleeding.  For shallow puncture wounds, remove the object if it is small and easy to do so.  If...

Restaurant Safety Americans love to dine out and the 8.1 million restaurant workers in the U.S. know it. Restaurant service providers, known as the “front” of the house, may include hosting staff, wait staff, and busboys. These workers may not slice, dice, and flambé on a regular basis, but there are hazards to consider in restaurant dining rooms. Wet floors and fast service can lead to slip, trip, and fall hazards. Mop up spills and clean up spilled ice immediately. Use signs to designate wet floors. Use extra caution when walking near wet floor areas. Consider non-slip matting for areas that are...